Jánský vrch castle stands on a hill above the town of Javorník in the north-western edge of Czech Silesia, in area what was a part of the Duchy of Nysa. For most of its history the castle belonged to the Prince-bishops of Breslau (Wrocław) in Silesia.

The castle is first mentioned in written sources in 1307, when it was still the property of the Princes of Svidník. In the 1348, they sold the castle to the Prince-bishop Preczlaus of Pogarell (1341–1376), and since that time, the castle belonged to Breslau bishops.

During the 15th century, the castle was considerably damaged by the Hussites and therefore large-scale repairs were needed. The rebuilding of the castle took place under the rule of Bishop Jan IV Roth, at the end of the 15th century, and it was completed in 1509 by his successor – Prince-bishop John V Thurzó (1506–1520). At that time, the castle was also renamed as Johannesberg, to honor the patron of the Bishops of Breslau, John the Baptist.

The original fortified castle was later rebuilt in the Baroque style under the rule of Philipp Gotthard von Schaffgotsch (1716–1795), who made it his primary residence. During this time, Johannesberg castle and the town Javorník also became the cultural center of Upper Silesia. Among the most famous personalities living there, was August Carl Ditters von Dittersdorf, renowned Viennese composer and violinist.

Following the death of Prince-Bishop Philipp Gotthard von Schaffgotsch, the castle was once again rebuilt as a summer residence by Bishop Joseph Christian Reichsfürst von Hohenlohe-Waldenburg-Bartenstein. It remained an important centre of cultural life in the region until the beginning of the 20th century.

In 1959, the castle Jánský Vrch was loaned to the State and recovered by the Czechoslovak government in 1984, following a property agreement between the Polish and Czechoslovak Catholic archdioceses. It is now under the administration of the National Monument Institute in Olomouc and since 1 January 2002, it is on the list of Czech national cultural monuments.

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Javorník, Czech Republic
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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jan Riha (3 years ago)
unfortunately to visit this castle is tragedy..i remeber much better experience done couple of years ago..i must say-typical czech behaviour however place and everything else have a great potential..sad..
Robert Korczak (3 years ago)
Typical Czech castle, not overly interesting.
Richard Irons (3 years ago)
A beautiful chalet in Czech Republic; well worth the visit. The interiors are showing their age, but overall it is a wonderful place. There are four different tours available, all at reasonable prices and you can pay with a credit card. There is also a small cafe, which is cash only and several hiking trails behind the chalet. Recommened.
Helena Pernicová (4 years ago)
A beautiful chateau located on the Czech-Polish border with a fantastic view of the lowlands. There's an opportunity to get a cosplay tour during Christmas/Easter time.
Piers Midwinter (4 years ago)
Lovely castle. Nice views. Definitely worth visiting....
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