St. John the Evangelist's Church

Paczków, Poland

St. John the Evangelist's Church in Paczków, Poland, is a Gothic church built in the fourteenth-century. The construction began in the year 1350 and lasted around 30 years. The shrine was funded by Bishop of Wrocław Preczlaw of Pogarell, who administered between 1341 and 1376. The present form of the church is in the Renaissance, Baroque and Neo-Gothic architectural styles. In the fifteenth-century, from the chancel's southern side, there was built a spanning chapel, dedicated to Holy Virgin Mary. The tower, partially deconstructed in 1429, was rebuilt in 1462. It was then that the upper condignation was constructed.

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Founded: 1350
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Artur Wyspianski (39 days ago)
A place definitely worth visiting when visiting Paczków. It is a unique church, because it also has a defensive function and has a well inside (it is probably the only such church in Europe). The gothic interior with a three-nave hall is impressive. The church is not open all day so sometimes you can "kiss the door handle". We were lucky, because the side entrances were open and there was absolutely no one in the temple itself.
Al Šejk (56 days ago)
Krásný kostel, nad chrámovou lodí je ještě nástavba.
Mateusz S (5 months ago)
The monumental gothic three-nave hall, beautiful net and star-shaped vault, rich furnishings, from gothic sculptures from Wit Stwosz's workshop, through the Renaissance Passion altar, to the mighty main altar, side altar, pulpit and Schlag organ front from 1888. An unusual well inside the parish.
Gosia Lazorko-Janska (12 months ago)
The incastelated parish church of St. John the Evangelist, formerly the Holy Trinity, Virgin Mary and St. Nicholas. It is located just outside the market square, close to the perfectly preserved city walls. It is a three-nave, hall Gothic temple with a high tower, exceptionally beautiful net and stellar vaults inside. In the 16th century, it was adapted to defensive functions by boring wells inside the church, lowering the roofs and covering them with a Renaissance attic that protected the church against fire and provided protection for shooting positions. The interior from the 19th century (neo-Gothic), although the Gothic altar, the tombstones and the baroque altar in the side chapel have been preserved. In addition, organs with a beautiful sound.
Gosia Lazorko-Janska (12 months ago)
The incastelated parish church of St. John the Evangelist, formerly the Holy Trinity, Virgin Mary and St. Nicholas. It is located just outside the market square, close to the perfectly preserved city walls. It is a three-nave, hall Gothic temple with a high tower, exceptionally beautiful net and stellar vaults inside. In the 16th century, it was adapted to defensive functions by boring wells inside the church, lowering the roofs and covering them with a Renaissance attic that protected the church against fire and provided protection for shooting positions. The interior from the 19th century (neo-Gothic), although the Gothic altar, the tombstones and the baroque altar in the side chapel have been preserved. In addition, organs with a beautiful sound.
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