St. Jadwiga's Church

Brzeg, Poland

St. Jadwiga's Church in Brzeg is a Gothic castle church. The Gothic brick-built chapel, adjoined to the south-western portion of Brzeg Castle was built in the former location of a collegiate church built between 1368 and 1369. In 1741, the chapel was destroyed due to Prussian bombardment, with only the presbytery having had survived. After its reconstruction in 1783-1784, the chapel served as the mausoleum for the Silesian Piasts (after 1945, 22 sarcophagi were found in the crypt). The chapel suffered damage during World War II, and was reconsecrated as a church in 1989.

Presently, the sarcophagi are located in the adjoined Silesian Piasts Brzeg Castle Museum.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

plac Zamkowy 8, Brzeg, Poland
See all sites in Brzeg

Details

Founded: 1368
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Krzysztof G (9 months ago)
The gothic church, the oldest one in Brzeg. The origins date back to the 13th century. Rebuilt in the 20th century. The body of the church is huge with two huge towers connected by a bridge. It resembles a bit the witches' bridge from the church of St. Mary Magdalene in Wrocław. . The decor is modest, but we've seen some pieces of equipment in the castle museum. Beautiful soaring columns and a stained glass window on the altar.
Wojciech Wojciech (13 months ago)
The church is impressive from the outside with its size and panache, but inside it is just pearls! These stained glass windows, paintings, altar ... worth seeing!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Petersberg Citadel

The Petersberg Citadel is one of the largest extant early-modern citadels in Europe and covers the whole north-western part of the Erfurt city centre. It was built after 1665 on Petersberg hill and was in military use until 1963. It dates from a time when Erfurt was ruled by the Electors of Mainz and is a unique example of the European style of fortress construction. Beneath the citadel is an underground maze of passageways that can be visited on guided tours organised by Erfurt Tourist Office.

The citadel was originally built on the site of a medieval Benedictine Monastery and the earliest parts of the complex date from the 12th century. Erfurt has also been ruled by Sweden, Prussia, Napoleon, the German Empire, the Nazis, and post-World War II Soviet occupying forces, and it was part of the German Democratic Republic (East Germany). All of these regimes used Petersberg Citadel and had an influence on its development. The baroque fortress was in military use until 1963. Since German reunification in 1990, the citadel has undergone significant restoration and it is now open to the public as a historic site.