Saints Peter and Paul Church

Brzeg, Poland

Saints Peter and Paul Church was built in the thirteenth-century, subsequently expanded in 1338, and transformed after a fire in the sixteenth-century. In 1527, after Frederick II of Legnica introduced Lutheranism into Brzeg, the town's Franciscans were expelled, with the basilica acquired by the town authorities. In 1582, the building was rebuilt into an arsenal. The fire service moved into the building the nineteenth-thirties.

After the Great Flood of 1997, the basilica's tower, together with some of its walls collapsed. Since 2001, the basilica has undergone renovation works, with the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Wrocław acquiring the church in 2003. In 2013, the archdiocese received funds of 1 700 000 złoty from the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage of Poland to rebuild the roof and rebuild the basilica's Gothic windows.

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Address

plac Młynów 9, Brzeg, Poland
See all sites in Brzeg

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Matěj Lošťák (2 years ago)
Goticky farním kostel v bývalém pevnostním městě Brzeg. Jedná se o typickou Německou cihlovou sakrální stavbu. Kostel pochází z 14. stol. V roce 1945 po 2 týdením obléhání sovětskou armádou byl značně poničen a vyhořel, ostatně jako 50% historického města. Narozdíl od osudu většiny poničených staveb v centru se dočkal docela přesné rekonstrukce a obnovy, která byla završena 1967.
Krzysztof K (2 years ago)
I don't know why, but this church immediately reminded me of the game Gothic 3. Outside it looks heavy and massive. But inside we have a large space, a large stained glass window and a rib vault. The interior is quite austere. But that adds to the charm of this church.
brat serafin (3 years ago)
Beautiful gothic church. Being in Brzeg, you must see this monument that is beautifully cared for by the faithful.
Katerina (3 years ago)
It's a beautiful Gothic basilica, very high with 2 towers, and stained glass windows. It will appeal to everyone who admires architectural buildings
Anastasiia Prytuzhalova (3 years ago)
Calm place
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Tyniec Abbey

Tyniec Benedictine abbey was founded by King Casimir the Restorer probably around 1044. Casimir decided to rebuild the newly established Kingdom of Poland, after a Pagan rebellion and a disastrous Czech raid of Duke Bretislaus I (1039). The Benedictines, invited to Tyniec by the King, were tasked with restoring order as well as cementing the position of the State and the Church. First Tyniec Abbot was Aaron, who became the Bishop of Kraków. Since there is no conclusive evidence to support the foundation date as 1040, some historians claim that the abbey was founded by Casimir the Restorer’ son, King Boleslaw II the Generous.

In the second half of the 11th century, a complex of Romanesque buildings was completed, consisting of a basilica and the abbey. In the 14th century, it was destroyed in Tatar and Czech raids, and in the 15th century it was rebuilt in Gothic style. Further remodelings took place in the 17th and 18th centuries, first in Baroque, then in Rococo style. The abbey was partly destroyed in the Swedish invasion of Poland, and soon afterwards was rebuilt, with a new library. Further destruction took place during the Bar Confederation, when Polish rebels turned the abbey into their fortress.

In 1816, Austrian authorities liquidated the abbey, and in 1821-1826, it was the seat of the Bishop of Tyniec, Grzegorz Tomasz Ziegler. The monks, however, did not return to the abbey until 1939, and in 1947, remodelling of the neglected complex was initiated. In 1968, the Church of St. Peter and Paul was once again named the seat of the abbot. The church itself consists of a Gothic presbytery and a Baroque main nave. Several altars were created by an 18th-century Italian sculptor Francesco Placidi. The church also has a late Baroque pulpit by Franciszek Jozef Mangoldt.