Saints Peter and Paul Church

Brzeg, Poland

Saints Peter and Paul Church was built in the thirteenth-century, subsequently expanded in 1338, and transformed after a fire in the sixteenth-century. In 1527, after Frederick II of Legnica introduced Lutheranism into Brzeg, the town's Franciscans were expelled, with the basilica acquired by the town authorities. In 1582, the building was rebuilt into an arsenal. The fire service moved into the building the nineteenth-thirties.

After the Great Flood of 1997, the basilica's tower, together with some of its walls collapsed. Since 2001, the basilica has undergone renovation works, with the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Wrocław acquiring the church in 2003. In 2013, the archdiocese received funds of 1 700 000 złoty from the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage of Poland to rebuild the roof and rebuild the basilica's Gothic windows.

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Address

plac Młynów 9, Brzeg, Poland
See all sites in Brzeg

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

brat serafin (36 days ago)
Beautiful gothic church. Being in Brzeg, you must see this monument that is beautifully cared for by the faithful.
Katerina (9 months ago)
It's a beautiful Gothic basilica, very high with 2 towers, and stained glass windows. It will appeal to everyone who admires architectural buildings
Anastasiia Prytuzhalova (10 months ago)
Calm place
Agata Ilkow (16 months ago)
Nice big gothic church with beautiful stained glass. Best to visit on a hot summer day because inside is pleasant and cool.
Marek Síbrt (17 months ago)
If you travel from Opole to Wroclaw...stop in Brzeg...St. Nicolas Churg is so tall, so huge, so impressive...And full of the pilgrims...
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