St. James' Church serves as a church on the pilgrimage route to St. James Church in Santiago de Compostela, Spain. The church was built between 1311-1484. Its east chancel was completed in 1322, nave built from 1373-1436, and west choir, which bridges the street, from 1453-1471. The church was consecrated in 1485 by the Bishop of Würzburg. In 1525 the peasant leader Florian Geyer read aloud the articles of the revolting peasants from its west chancel.

Its western gallery contains the famous Holy Blood altarpiece of the Würzburg wood carver Tilman Riemenschneider, carved 1500-1505, (illustrated below) which includes a rock crystal reliquary cross (c. 1270). The altar includes scenes of the entry into Jerusalem (right wing), Lord's Supper (shrine) with Judas as central figure and the Mount of Olives (left wing).

Other important relics include the High Altar (1466 by Friedrich Herlin, a pupil of Rogier van der Weyden) in the east choir, which represents on its back side the oldest depiction of the city of Rothenburg and rare images of the Jakobs pilgrim legend, as well as an altar of Tilman Riemenschneider and Mary Coronation altar with sculptures from different centuries, including the Riemenschneider school. The stained glass windows of the east chancel are adorned with valuable images from 1350-1400 AD, including the left window with scenes of the life of the Virgin Mary, central window with scenes from Christ's life and passion, and right window representing Christ's work of redemption and sacraments.

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Details

Founded: 1311-1484
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Craig Weis (2 years ago)
Just stopped for a visit and to see some of the beauty and architecture
Karl Themel (2 years ago)
This church also has an altar carved by Tilman Riemenschneider.
Terry Bixler (2 years ago)
The architecture is outstanding. I did not go inside as I was busy doing an overview tour of Rothenburg. The detail in the exterior was outstanding. I imagine the interior stained glass windows were dramatic.
Bill (3 years ago)
Are you serious? You charge for entering? After having been to more than a dozen famous churches and cathedrals in the US and Europe, this is the second one does so, after Cathedral of Our Lady in Antwerp! No mean to underestimate the effort people put in, I just do not think it's a right way.
A R (3 years ago)
It is nice from the outside. They charge a fee to enter and inside is just one more regular church. Not worth visiting at all being so many better ones in Europe and with free admision.
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