Weikersheim Palace

Weikersheim, Germany

Weikersheim Palace (Schloss Weikersheim) was built in the 12th century, however the exact year is not known. The palace was the traditional seat of the princely family of Hohenlohe. In the 16th century, Count Wolfgang II inherited Weikersheim after a division of estates and made it his main home. He converted the moated castle into a magnificent Renaissance palace, whose splendid rooms have been preserved with their furnishings. Aside from the large chandelier and the Lambris painting added in the 18th century, the banqueting hall remains in its original state. Princess Elisabeth Friederike Sophie's audience room was known as the 'beautiful room' because of its exquisite furnishings.

The baroque interior and palace garden date from 1710. The garden in particular with its axial arrangement and many statues exemplifies the baroque style. A permanent exhibition on the theme of alchemy is on display in the former palace kitchen, enabling visitors to discover more about Count Wolfgang II von Hohenlohe and his alchemy laboratory. The double-winged, arcaded orangery from 1723 has a total length of just under 100 metres and marks the point where the palace garden takes over from the untamed surrounding nature. An elaborate series of sculpted figures adorns the garden at Weikersheim Palace. This 'garden kingdom' includes the four seasons, the four elements and the four winds, the gods of the planets around the Hercules fountain, a number of other classical gods and a 'court' of dwarfs.

The palace has been owned by the state of Baden-Württemberg since 1967 when the palace was bought from the estate of Prince Constantin von Hohenlohe, who had encouraged arts-related activities at the palace. Today the palace is home to the Jeunesses Musicales Germany during the summer and the Weikersheim Think Tank. It is also used for large gatherings and weddings.

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Details

Founded: 1586
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Reformation & Wars of Religion (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Katie Mc (2 years ago)
Rooms are absolutely stunning! Apparently according to the tour guide all the furniture (including the beds and chairs ) are all the originals from the castle. They've been restored to a fantastic standard!
Manuela Bussler-Sweeney (3 years ago)
We loved everything about this castle and it's gardens! Beautiful area!
Jamie (3 years ago)
Impressive palace for a relatively small, quaint town. Beautifully kept gardens to wonder around for just €1.80 concession. Worthwhile stop on the Romantic Road
Frank Duke III (3 years ago)
Very cool place! Beautiful view and gardens! Time we'll spent. RELAXING atmosphere and historical.
Justin Bunch (3 years ago)
A freak accident of history where the palace was built and then never used, giving us a glimpse back into time to the Renaissance and Baroque. The Renaissance hall is truly remarkable and impressive. Don't forget to enjoy the gardens set in the pastoral landscape of Franconia
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