Weikersheim Palace

Weikersheim, Germany

Weikersheim Palace (Schloss Weikersheim) was built in the 12th century, however the exact year is not known. The palace was the traditional seat of the princely family of Hohenlohe. In the 16th century, Count Wolfgang II inherited Weikersheim after a division of estates and made it his main home. He converted the moated castle into a magnificent Renaissance palace, whose splendid rooms have been preserved with their furnishings. Aside from the large chandelier and the Lambris painting added in the 18th century, the banqueting hall remains in its original state. Princess Elisabeth Friederike Sophie's audience room was known as the 'beautiful room' because of its exquisite furnishings.

The baroque interior and palace garden date from 1710. The garden in particular with its axial arrangement and many statues exemplifies the baroque style. A permanent exhibition on the theme of alchemy is on display in the former palace kitchen, enabling visitors to discover more about Count Wolfgang II von Hohenlohe and his alchemy laboratory. The double-winged, arcaded orangery from 1723 has a total length of just under 100 metres and marks the point where the palace garden takes over from the untamed surrounding nature. An elaborate series of sculpted figures adorns the garden at Weikersheim Palace. This 'garden kingdom' includes the four seasons, the four elements and the four winds, the gods of the planets around the Hercules fountain, a number of other classical gods and a 'court' of dwarfs.

The palace has been owned by the state of Baden-Württemberg since 1967 when the palace was bought from the estate of Prince Constantin von Hohenlohe, who had encouraged arts-related activities at the palace. Today the palace is home to the Jeunesses Musicales Germany during the summer and the Weikersheim Think Tank. It is also used for large gatherings and weddings.

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Details

Founded: 1586
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Reformation & Wars of Religion (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

JudyF (14 months ago)
Rich history of the Hohenlohe family and a fabulous pomace to walk, hike and explore.
Mihai Belcan (14 months ago)
Definitely worth a visit if you're in the region! The castle itself is not too big, but the ballroom is extraordinary and the garden is marvelous. The guided tours are only in German, but you can get a small leaflet in English describing all the rooms, so you can get an idea what the guide is talking about.
PTP (16 months ago)
Nice place to visit with family ?.
Haris V.M (17 months ago)
Nice place for one day trip. Garden so amazing. Nothing special inside the castle. If you are not interested that much then only to take ticket to the garden.
Edward van Hazendonk (2 years ago)
The town is nice, didn't see the Castle an Gardens so cannot comment on them.
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