The Franciscan Friary of Rothenburg ob der Tauber is a former friary of the Conventual Franciscans in the town of Rothenburg ob der Tauber. The friary, dedicated to the Virgin Mary, was founded in 1281 by Hermann von Hornburg, Schultheiß of Rothenburg, and others. It was wound up in 1548 in the wake of the Reformation.

The buildings of the friary, vacated voluntarily, were used initially for the establishment of a grammar school, later as a home for the widows of priests. In 1805 the building became, among other things, a salt store. Parts of the premises (cloisters, refectory, etc.) were demolished; many of the contents were destroyed or sold, including the Wiblinger Altar by Tilman Riemenschneider.

In spite of the losses and damages of the past the church today is a significant example of the church of a mendicant order, with a rood screen and important art treasures.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1281
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hippek der Grosse (13 months ago)
Interesting, Protestant church, but very difficult to rate - was closed ??. Unfortunately only open for two hours in the afternoon on Sunday - a pity ... many tourists and guests want to visit the church ... unfortunately disappointment ??. I am totally disappointed because I expected a little more ... from me only three stars ⭐⭐⭐ ...
Nicole Schädler (20 months ago)
Very nice church in a city worth seeing.
Charles Clampitt (2 years ago)
Fun town and the walking tour of the town is well worth it.
Emiliano N. (2 years ago)
Beautiful church also famous for the coming of Pope Francis not too long ago located a few steps from the main square of Rothemburg free admission, not to be missed. This town never betrays ...... Fantastic in all its splendor and in all that it has to offer
Peter Munnichs (3 years ago)
Imposante kerk met mooi en artistiek houtsnijwerk van Tilman Riemenschneider. Apart is ook het schilderwerk op het altaar. Hier heeft een van de apostelen niet alleen een brilletje op, maar heeft hij zelfs al een boek in de handen. Beiden worden echter pas meer dan duizend jaar na het laatste avondmaal uitgevonden. Toch een mooie vondst in dit schilderij.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Roman Walls of Lugo

Roman Walls of Lugo are an exceptional architectural, archaeological and constructive legacy of Roman engineering, dating from the 3rd and 4th centuries AD. The Walls are built of internal and external stone facings of slate with some granite, with a core filling of a conglomerate of slate slabs and worked stone pieces from Roman buildings, interlocked with lime mortar.

Their total length of 2117 m in the shape of an oblong rectangle occupies an area of 1.68 ha. Their height varies between 8 and 10 m, with a width of 4.2 m, reaching 7 m in some specific points. The walls still contain 85 external towers, 10 gates (five of which are original and five that were opened in modern times), four staircases and two ramps providing access to the walkway along the top of the walls, one of which is internal and the other external. Each tower contained access stairs leading from the intervallum to the wall walk of town wall, of which a total of 21 have been discovered to date.

The defences of Lugo are the most complete and best preserved example of Roman military architecture in the Western Roman Empire.

Despite the renovation work carried out, the walls conserve their original layout and the construction features associated with their defensive purpose, with walls, battlements, towers, fortifications, both modern and original gates and stairways, and a moat.

Since they were built, the walls have defined the layout and growth of the city, which was declared a Historical-Artistic Ensemble in 1973, forming a part of it and becoming an emblematic structure that can be freely accessed to walk along. The local inhabitants and visitors alike have used them as an area for enjoyment and as a part of urban life for centuries.

The fortifications were added to UNESCO"s World Heritage List in late 2000 and are a popular tourist attraction.