The Franciscan Friary of Rothenburg ob der Tauber is a former friary of the Conventual Franciscans in the town of Rothenburg ob der Tauber. The friary, dedicated to the Virgin Mary, was founded in 1281 by Hermann von Hornburg, Schultheiß of Rothenburg, and others. It was wound up in 1548 in the wake of the Reformation.

The buildings of the friary, vacated voluntarily, were used initially for the establishment of a grammar school, later as a home for the widows of priests. In 1805 the building became, among other things, a salt store. Parts of the premises (cloisters, refectory, etc.) were demolished; many of the contents were destroyed or sold, including the Wiblinger Altar by Tilman Riemenschneider.

In spite of the losses and damages of the past the church today is a significant example of the church of a mendicant order, with a rood screen and important art treasures.

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Details

Founded: 1281
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Peter Munnichs (2 years ago)
Imposante kerk met mooi en artistiek houtsnijwerk van Tilman Riemenschneider. Apart is ook het schilderwerk op het altaar. Hier heeft een van de apostelen niet alleen een brilletje op, maar heeft hij zelfs al een boek in de handen. Beiden worden echter pas meer dan duizend jaar na het laatste avondmaal uitgevonden. Toch een mooie vondst in dit schilderij.
Gianfranco Garcia (3 years ago)
Ilona Geffert (3 years ago)
Das sind hier richtig schöne Kirchen .
Dave Lott (3 years ago)
This is the real thing as far as old churches go. An abundance of original ancient art adorns this holy place.
Ilario Bonomi (4 years ago)
Una chiesa ricca di storia, la cui fondazione risale al 1285, interessante soprattutto per la balconata decorata che separa la parte riservata ai frati da quella riservata invece al popolo, dove rimane qualche traccia leggibile di affresco, e per le belle tombe di cui è ornata.
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