St. Alex Beguinage

Dendermonde, Belgium

The St. Alex beguinage (1288) consists of 61 houses built around a trapezoidal courtyard surrounding a small church. The beguinage is an island of tranquillity in the heart of town.

Similarly to the Belfry, the St. Alex beguinage has been proclaimed UNESCO World Heritage in 1998. To keep the memory of the beguines alive, one small house (nr.11 H. Bonifacius) has been furnished as an authentic beguine's home.

In 1975 the last beguine, Miss Ernestine De Bruyne, died. Her former home (nr. 25 H. Begga) holds a museum of folklore. Spread over three floors and a great many rooms, visitors will learn about housekeeping, work and recreation in the lives of former generations.

House nr. 20 disposes of a detailed historical documentation centre with a specialized library, photographs and slides concerning Dendermonde.

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Founded: 1288
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www.toerismedendermonde.be

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Erik Max (6 months ago)
Back to the past
Mr Van Damme (15 months ago)
Very quiet and peaceful place in the middle of the city center. Renovations are planned but not yet started. So the roads can be filled with puddles when it rains. Know that people live there so please respect their privacy. Update april 2021: renovations on the roads and surroundings are finished. The cobblestones give a very authentic feeling.
brieuc (2 years ago)
Small but very cute beguinage. However it currently undergoes a complete renovation (streets, garden, facades).
Kevin De Broe (3 years ago)
Great view
Diego Vertongen (3 years ago)
A little oasis of peace in the middle of the city. The site also contains a little museum. These is a place with a lot of history.
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