Käsmu Sea Museum

Käsmu, Estonia

Käsmu Sea Museum is located in a former border guard station building from Soviet Occupation period and presents the history of the village. The museum exhibits reflect all the areas connected to the sea - seafaring, fishing, smuggling trade and also the sea as a part of nature and as an object of photography and visual arts.

Reference: Wikitravel

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Address

Merekooli 4, Käsmu, Estonia
See all sites in Käsmu

Details

Founded: 1993
Category: Museums in Estonia
Historical period: New Independency (Estonia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jan Kriegel (2 years ago)
Very personal touch. Had a supper for a big group here in the evening with freshly smoked salmon dish. Lovely
Madis Mätlik (2 years ago)
Very interesting and beautiful history museum.
Oleg Gogol (2 years ago)
Awesome place! Extreme hospitality from owners. Absolutely suggested.
Victoria Godbold (2 years ago)
Small maritime museum about an hour away from Tallinn. Well worth a visit. Lots of interesting items to see all set in a charming building. Admission was free and it was close to a small beach. Beautiful scenery all around. You can have a meal and refreshments here.
Lisa Moore (2 years ago)
Very friendly, beautiful doggy called Rosa. Curator/proprieter very friendly and helpful and informative. Beautiful collection!
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