Sagadi Manor had owned by the von Fock family from the year 1687 to 1922. The current main main building was completed in 1753 and enlarged in 1793. It is one of the rare Rococo-style buildings in Estonia.

The manor house, annexes and the surrounding park have been restored. Today Sagadi hosts a manor museum (the interior has been also carefully restored and refurnished), forestry museum, park and hotel.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Sagadi küla, Vihula, Estonia
See all sites in Vihula

Details

Founded: 1753
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nerijus Spaicys (14 months ago)
Aivar Sikk (14 months ago)
Vabaõhu etendus,buffet jube kallis,suveniiride pood lahti.Rikkaliku ja maitsva hommikusöögiga,kuna hetkel õues jahe,siis ka toas.
Priit Adler (19 months ago)
Puhas
Vadim Sinitskiy (2 years ago)
Great restaurant near the hotel. It is quite, cozy, good-serviced and with very good cuisine. All we have ordered was great, even a coffee :)
Daniel Zihlmann (2 years ago)
Die Zimmer sind klein aber gemütlich. Leider stank es erbärmlich aus dem Abfluss im Badezimmer.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Sirmione Castle

Sirmione castle was built near the end of the 12th century as part of a defensive network surrounding Verona. The castle was maintained and extended first as part of the Veronese protection against their rivals in Milan and later under the control of the Venetian inland empire. The massive fortress is totally surrounded by water and has an inner porch which houses a Roman and Medieval lapidary. From the drawbridge, a staircase leads to the walkways above the walls, providing a marvellous view of the harbour that once sheltered the Scaliger fleet. The doors were fitted with a variety of locking systems, including a drawbridge for horses, carriages and pedestrians, a metal grate and, more recently, double hinged doors. Venice conquered Sirmione in 1405, immediately adopting provisions to render the fortress even more secure, fortifying its outer walls and widening the harbour.

Thanks to its strategical geographical location as a border outpost, Sirmione became a crucial defence and control garrison for the ruling nobles, retaining this function until the 16th century, when its role was taken up by Peschiera del Garda.