Sagadi Manor had owned by the von Fock family from the year 1687 to 1922. The current main main building was completed in 1753 and enlarged in 1793. It is one of the rare Rococo-style buildings in Estonia.

The manor house, annexes and the surrounding park have been restored. Today Sagadi hosts a manor museum (the interior has been also carefully restored and refurnished), forestry museum, park and hotel.

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Address

Sagadi küla, Vihula, Estonia
See all sites in Vihula

Details

Founded: 1753
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nerijus Spaicys (2 years ago)
Aivar Sikk (2 years ago)
Vabaõhu etendus,buffet jube kallis,suveniiride pood lahti.Rikkaliku ja maitsva hommikusöögiga,kuna hetkel õues jahe,siis ka toas.
Priit Adler (2 years ago)
Puhas
Vadim Sinitskiy (3 years ago)
Great restaurant near the hotel. It is quite, cozy, good-serviced and with very good cuisine. All we have ordered was great, even a coffee :)
Daniel Zihlmann (3 years ago)
Die Zimmer sind klein aber gemütlich. Leider stank es erbärmlich aus dem Abfluss im Badezimmer.
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