Rakvere Church of the Holy Trinity

Rakvere, Estonia

The first church of Rakvere was built in 1430’s and sanctified to St. Michael. The dilapidated church was reconstructed between 1684-1891. The Rakvere church was damaged in the Great Northern War and restored in 1752 and again in 1850’s. The unusually high and slender spire was added during the last renovation. The beautiful pulpit was made by C. Ackermann in 1690 and the altar by Johann Rabe in 1730.

Reference: Tapio Mäkeläinen 2005. Viro - kartanoiden, kirkkojen ja kukkaketojen maa. Tammi, Helsinki, Finland.

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Address

Pikk 19, Rakvere, Estonia
See all sites in Rakvere

Details

Founded: 1430's
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Margit Henno (8 months ago)
Norm.
Aili Ilves (8 months ago)
Armas koht
George On tour (11 months ago)
n 1226, when Henriks wrote a chronicle of Livonia, Rakvere Vallimägi was the Tarvanpea village of old Estonians. Before Rakvere, the names Wesenbergh and Rakowor were still used. Town rights became Rakvere in 1302. Until 1346, Rakvere was in the possession of the Kingdom of Denmark. The first known clergy data in Rakvere originate from the middle of the 13th century, but in the city and parish church only from the beginning of the XV century
Priit Adler (19 months ago)
Eriline
Jyrki Peltonen (2 years ago)
Vanha kirkko , auki joulupyhinä ja uutenavuotena ohjelman mukaisesti. 1226. aastal, kui Läti Henrik oma Liivimaa kroonikat kirjutas, paiknes Rakvere Vallimäel vanade eestlaste puulinnus Tarvanpea. Enne Rakveret olid kasutusel veel nimed Wesenbergh ja Rakowor. Linnaõigused sai Rakvere 1302.
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