Vihula Manor complex is one of the largest and most and significant in Estonia. It belonged to von Schubert family between 1810-1919. Most of the over 20 buildings date back to the 19th century. The main building was constructed in 1892 to replace the earlier one destroyed by fire.

Today Vihula Manor provides luxurious accommodation in historical manor buildings. There is also a spa, conference center and golf courses available.

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Address

Vihula küla, Vihula, Estonia
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Details

Founded: 1892
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sander Post (2 years ago)
Very nice and quiet place to just relax and take it easy. Wonderful pillows. In my opinion number 1 mansion in Estonia
Ege Lehtsaar (2 years ago)
We loved our stay at Vihula manor. We stayed at a zen suite. Our room was really cozy and private which was perfect for a romantic vacation. The surroundings on the estate are beatiful. We stayed only for one night and during winter, but we would definitely want to go back during summer and stay for longer, because it looks like they have a lot of activity oportunities, for example discgolf and spa which we didn't have time to use. Restaraunt was great, my best experience of all hotel visitations in Estonia. Food looked and tasted amazing. Breakfast food selection for ditterent items was not very big like in bigger hotels but there was no need for it because everything in the selection was with good quality and very inviting. Staff was very friendly and attentive towards our needs.
Punta Teno (2 years ago)
A very beautiful area, consisted of many old, nicely renovated buildings and huge terrain around, very well preserved too. Even a 1,5 kms hiking trail on the premises...! Everything situated only about 4-5 kms from the sea and great, sandy beach with big stones. The hotel is very nice, but what we liked most was the really exceptional breakfast with a great choice (eg. 8 types of herrings!; fresh fruits, many yoghurts, apart from all the usually served things like ham, cheese, eggs, sausages, cereals etc.). Steam sauna and pool free of charge. Other saunas and spa treatments additionally paid. Great to be there (especially if you catch some good promotion!, as the regular price are rather high), even if some can say it all seems to be a bit snobbish...
Peeter Tomusk (2 years ago)
The scenery is amazing and the staff is friendly. But, the broken door on our bathroom didn't get fixed during our four day stay. Breakfast is offered from 8-10, but they stop replenishing the servings at around 9:15.
Pavel Stassi (2 years ago)
Perfect place to get away from the city. It's especially beautiful during summer time. Has all sorts of activities including golf, museum, spa, animals, restaurants.
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Hagios Demetrios

The Church of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios, is the main sanctuary dedicated to Saint Demetrius, the patron saint of Thessaloniki. It is part of the site Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki on the list of World Heritage Sites by UNESCO since 1988.

The first church on the spot was constructed in the early 4th century AD, replacing a Roman bath. A century later, a prefect named Leontios replaced the small oratory with a larger, three-aisled basilica. Repeatedly gutted by fires, the church eventually was reconstructed as a five-aisled basilica in 629–634. This was the surviving form of the church much as it is today. The most important shrine in the city, it was probably larger than the local cathedral. The historic location of the latter is now unknown.

The church had an unusual shrine called the ciborium, a hexagonal, roofed structure at one side of the nave. It was made of or covered with silver. The structure had doors and inside was a couch or bed. Unusually, it did not hold any physical relics of the saint. The ciborium seems to have been a symbolic tomb. It was rebuilt at least once.

The basilica is famous for six extant mosaic panels, dated to the period between the latest reconstruction and the inauguration of the Byzantine Iconoclasm in 730. These mosaics depict St. Demetrius with officials responsible for the restoration of the church (called the founders, ktetors) and with children. An inscription below one of the images glorifies heaven for saving the people of Thessalonica from a pagan Slavic raid in 615.

Thessaloniki became part of the Ottoman Empire in 1430. About 60 years later, during the reign of Bayezid II, the church was converted into a mosque, known as the Kasımiye Camii after the local Ottoman mayor, Cezeri Kasım Pasha. The symbolic tomb however was kept open for Christian veneration. Other magnificent mosaics, recorded as covering the church interior, were lost either during the four centuries when it functioned as a mosque (1493–1912) or in the Great Thessaloniki Fire of 1917 that destroyed much of the city. It also destroyed the roof and upper walls of the church. Black-and-white photographs and good watercolour versions give an idea of the early Byzantine craftsmanship lost during the fire.

Following the Great Fire of 1917, it took decades to restore the church. Tombstones from the city"s Jewish cemetery - destroyed by the Greek and Nazi German authorities - were used as building materials in these restoration efforts in the 1940s. Archeological excavations conducted in the 1930s and 1940s revealed interesting artifacts that may be seen in a museum situated inside the church"s crypt. The excavations also uncovered the ruins of a Roman bath, where St. Demetrius was said to have been held prisoner and executed. A Roman well was also discovered. Scholars believe this is where soldiers dropped the body of St. Demetrius after his execution. After restoration, the church was reconsecrated in 1949.