Negova was most probably settled already in the Stone Age and in the Bronze Age. Negova was first mentioned in 12th century as Negoinezelo, most probably after a Slavic man Negoj, who is often mentioned in the records from Middle age. There was the oldest count in the whole region and there is still a pillory to bear witness to this. The history of Negova is closely linked whit the castle. For a short time in the 15th century it was occupied by Hungarians under King Matthias Corvinus (a large built-in hall dating to 1487 proves that). Then it was taken by the Habsburgs and finally in the 16th century by the Trautmannsdorfs counts, who owned it until the end of World War II.

From the 15th century on it was rebuilt many times. In the 16th century a resident part was added along whit another wall and several small towers. In the 17th century the outside noble wing was built and the baroque palest yard. At the entrance to the castle is a stone carved vault, above which is the Trautmannsdorfs coat - of - arms.

The original Church of Virgin Mary was built in 16th century. It was the countess Katarina Trautmannsdorf who had it constructed. The first priest felt that it became too small and has the Church rebuilt.

The secret of the Negova helmets, which were found by Jurij Slaček, when he was cutting trees in the woods at Ženjak in 1811, has never been revealed. In one place he found 26 bronze helmet, most of which have now either been destroyed our lost. Just one is in Slovenia in national museum in Ljubljana. The bronze helmets belong to the end of the Hallstatt – iron period in the time between 450-350 BC. The finding is even more mysterious because on of the helmets bears a votive inscription in the writing of the Venets. It is believed that it is the language spoken 2000 years ago in the area of today’s Slovenia by the carriers of the Slovenian Hallstatt culture.

The castle of Negova always boasted distinguished owners. From 1542 to 1945 it was the feudal estate of the Trautmannsdorfs. It was this family that had a renaissance castle complete whit casemates built in front of the old castle beginning in 1568 and finishing after the Turkish siege in 1605.

At the entrance to the castle,which is surrounded by a slopefromthree sides, is a stone carved vault, above which is the Trautmannsdorfs' coat-of-arms bearing the date 1613. In the past there was a moat around the castle so the only way to enter was by crossing a bridge.

The castle is divided into three parts: the old part, the new part and the front part. The wall connected the front part of the castle – the stables, whit the new part, while the old castle is located in the walls behind the new building. Originally there were towers on all four corners. There is one underground tunnel leading from the old castle, but its location has long been forgotten. When the fish pounds around the castle were abandoned, the well in the castle ran dry. This well had been dug by two prisoners sentenced to death, but set free for their work.

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Negova 13, Negova, Slovenia
See all sites in Negova

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovenia

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sergej F (2 years ago)
Peaceful place and solid castle. Renovation make part of this castle more modern than medieval style.
Alojz Urbajs (2 years ago)
Historical object
Erzsébet Könczöl-Kiss (2 years ago)
The castle is renovated from outside and one of the three parts of the building from inside too. Looks really very nice. The inner parts are rebuilt with a rather modern look. It is used for weddings (as most of Solwenian castles) and exhibitions. It is more than surprising that the rooms are almost empty. Well, all of them. The view from the castle is beautiful.
Matej Hafner (3 years ago)
Nice Castle with our Ancestors guide, pictures, bar..
Peter Verbic (3 years ago)
Almost empty castle for now
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