The Schloßberg is the site of ancient fortress in the centre of the city of Graz, Austria. The hill is now a public park and enjoys extensive views of the city. The fortification of the Schloßberg goes back to at least the 10th century. In the mid-16th century, a 400 m long fortress was constructed by architects from the north of Italy. There are records of a cable-hauled lift being in use between 1528 and 1595 to move construction materials for the fortifications. The castle was never conquered, but it was largely demolished by Napoleonic forces under the Treaty of Schönbrunn of 1809. The clock tower (the Uhrturm) and bell tower (the Glockenturm) were spared after the people of Graz paid a ransom for their preservation.

The remains of the castle were turned into a public park by Ludwig von Welden in 1839. The park contains the Uhrturm, the Glockenturm, a cistern and two bastions from the old castle. The Uhrturm is a recognisable icon for the city, and is unusual in that the clock's hands have opposite roles to the common notion, with the larger one marking hours while the smaller is for minutes. The Glockenturm contains Liesl, the heaviest bell in Graz.

Near the Uhrturm there is a café with views over the old town. Additionally, on the western side of the Schloßberg, there are two small cafés, one with table service and the other one with self-service. Next to the terminus of the funicular railway there is a hilltop restaurant with views of western Graz. In what was once the cellar of one of the ruined bastions is the Kasemattenbühne, an open-air stage for concerts and performances.

Below the Schloßberg hill is an extensive system of tunnels, which were created during the second world war to protect the civilian population of Graz from aerial bombing. Some of these tunnels are still accessible, including a passage from Schloßbergplatz to Karmeliterplatz, and a grotto railway for children. Also in the tunnel complex is the Dom im Berg, which was expanded in 2000 to provide a venue space for up to 600 people.

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Schloßberg, Graz, Austria
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Founded: 10th century
Category: Ruins in Austria

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User Reviews

JB JB (2 years ago)
The Schloßberg Park is really a wonderful place to see. Indeed, the fortress at the top, the many statues, the beautiful gardens, the breathtaking view of the city of Graz and the unmissable clock tower make this hill a truly unique and atypical place in the region, to see absolutely.
K R (2 years ago)
Beautiful place, a big fortress complex above Graz, offering a stunnic panoramic view of the city. There are several cafe's to enjoy a pleasant day there or one could simply sit on dozens of well situated park benches and relax. A must see!
Antonis Karakottas (2 years ago)
Very nice view of the entire city of Graz! You have to go up there. Very beautiful historical monuments too. You have to go down by the slide.
Marko Matić (2 years ago)
There are four ways to climb on the hill. By foot (260 stairs), by funicular (I think it is still under construction), by elevator or by car. I visited the hill twice, once by foot and second by car. On the hill you are witness to a beautiful sight to the whole city. There is one big clock tower, two restaurants, one big stage for cultural events and one of the most beautiful bars with amazing view over the city. Be aware that this bar is closed almost whole February, so avoid to visit it then :) Try local beer there! It is a perfect spot for romantic moments, so guys you should take your girls there :)
dijana palada (3 years ago)
After visiting Schlossberg we decided to use stairs to climb down the hill. But when we reached the foot of the hill we found out that somebody had closed the fence. We didn't have many choices: like many others we climbed over the fence. That was easy for young and tall persons but the older one needed a help. A big minus for Graz Tourist Board.
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