Graz Cathedral

Graz, Austria

Graz Cathedral is dedicated to Saint Giles. It is the seat of the bishop of the Steiermark diocese. The church was built in 1438-1462 by Friederick III in the Gothic architecture. It was refurbished in Baroque style in the late 17th and early 18th centuries.

The exterior of the cathedral looks very sober today. In the Gothic period, however, the façades were covered with paintings. One fresco has been preserved - the so-called Gottesplagenbild ('God's Plagues'). It refers to a year of horrors Graz suffered in 1480.

The interior of the cathedral hormoniously combines Gothic architecture with Baroque furnishing. The frescos in the church date from the times of Emperor Frederick III. Among them: a fragment showing St. Christopher, clearly recognizable as Frederick wearing the Styrian ducal crown.

Among the most precious objects in the cathedral are the two reliquaries to the left and the right of the chancel entrance. Originally the chests belonged to Paola Gonzaga. In 1477 she married Leonhard of Gorizia and brought along her bridal chests from her native Mantua to Leonhard's castle Bruck near Lienz in East Tyrol.

Nearby is Mausoleum of Emperor Ferdinand II.

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Address

Burggasse 3, Graz, Austria
See all sites in Graz

Details

Founded: 1438-1462
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hazafias Népfront (20 months ago)
Nice cathedral
Robert Mentecki (21 months ago)
I'm not a religious person. But this is a stunning church. The design and architecture is fascinating.
ddur77 (2 years ago)
Beutiful...
Vincent Oliver (2 years ago)
An imposing cathedral with a very ornate interior. Take your time to admire the details of the sculptures and the smaller side alters. Entrance is free but a donation is appreciated. Also don’t miss the frescoe outside behind the glass, albeit faded and unclear, but the description underneath is informative.
Andreas Polz (5 years ago)
Cathedral, bishops seat. Architecture part of the main power ensemble together with the Burg/governmental seat. Impressive, but not the largest church in Graz. Seek out St Barbara's chapel, where the catholic resistance hid from the Nazi regime during WWII.
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