Mausoleum of Emperor Ferdinand II

Graz, Austria

The Mausoleum of Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand II is located next to the Cathedral of Graz. Turquoise domes stand out against the blue sky above the Mausoleum and, together with the Dom and Katharinenkirche church, define one of the city’s magnificent views.

In 1614 Ferdinand commissioned his Italian court painter and architect to erect a mausoleum and an adjacent St. Catherine's Church next to today's Cathedral. It was to become one of the most important buildings of the early 17th century in Austria. The oval dome above the tomb chapel was the first of its kind built outside Italy. The façade of St. Catherine's is composed with rich small details and demonstrates the taste of time at the threshold of Renaissance and Baroque. As a gable statue, St. Catherine of Alexandria is looking to the former Jesuit college opposite, where in 1585 Graz University was founded. After all, St. Catherine is worshipped as the patron saint of universities.

In 1619 Ferdinand was elected emperor and left Graz for Vienna. Construction work at the Mausoleum came to a standstill. So in 1637 Ferdinand was laid to rest in a half-finished tomb. The vault is dominated by an impressive sarcophagus of red marble. It is the final resting place of Ferdinand's mother, Maria of Bavaria. Just a plain tablet on the wall indicates the grave of Emperor Ferdinand.

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Address

Burggasse 2a, Graz, Austria
See all sites in Graz

Details

Founded: 1614
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Austria

More Information

www.graztourismus.at

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nebojsa Bogosavljevic (2 years ago)
Really great and historical place, it really represents Austro-Hungarian monarchy and theirs power back then. Visitor can see old flags on the ceiling that represent Austria and minor states in their empire. Mausoleum is story for itself in the same time is cool and scary place to be, but I loved this place my recommendations to visit it.
Asiyah Noemi Koso (2 years ago)
The burial-place of Emperor Ferdinand II is a combination of mausoleum (the cupola at the right side) and a church named Katharinenkirche. Wery beautiful. It is monumental sacral and representative building from the 17th century. The mausoleum is the impressive tomb of Emperor Ferdinand II and is part of the so-called Stadtkrone. The magnificent Mausoleum of Emperor Ferdinand II is undoubtedly Graz's most unusual building. It brings together with great harmony the mannerist character of the Austrian Baroque and the theatrical splendor of the great churches of Rome. Built under the direction of Giovanni Pietro de Pomis, the building shows strong Italian influences on the building. More or less we know the historical importance of Emperor Ferdinand II. He was a member of the Habsburg family , was Holy Roman Emperor , King of Bohemia and King of Hungary. He was the son of Archduke Charles II of Inner Austria, and Maria of Bavaria. That is why the size of his crypt is seen, it is enormous. The high altar is a early work of J. B. Fischer von Erlach, made from 1695 to 1697. Valuable are amazing ceiling's paintings. It is exceptionally beautiful and attractive. It is certainly worth visiting.
Beata Jurgielewicz (2 years ago)
Beautiful, must see in Graz, free entry :)
Влатко Б (3 years ago)
Nice place. Visit the room on the right side too.
Jesús Toro (3 years ago)
It's nice outside but not open on Sunday
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