Styrian Armoury

Graz, Austria

The Styrian Armoury (Landeszeughaus) is the world's largest historic armoury and attracts visitors from all over the world. It holds approximately 32,000 pieces of weaponry, tools, suits of armour for battle and ones for parades.

Between the 15th century and the 18th century, Styria was on the front line of almost continuous conflict with the Ottoman Empire and with rebels in Hungary. In order to defend itself it needed troops and these troops needed equipment. The Styrian Armoury results from the resulting need to store large quantities of armour and weapons, and was built from 1642 - 1645 by a Tyrolean architect called Antonio Solar.

After about 100 years in use, Austrian empress Maria Theresia wanted to close down the armoury, as part of her centralisation of the defence of Austria. Nevertheless Styria petitioned for the ongoing existence of the armoury for both practical and sentimental reasons. Their petition was accepted and the Armoury was left intact, but largely decommissioned.

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Address

Herrengasse 20a, Graz, Austria
See all sites in Graz

Details


Category: Museums in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tim Biggs (19 months ago)
This is the armoury in Graz, and holds a wonderful selection of 15th to 18th century weapons and armour. What is initially suprising is that it is truely an armoury- you might have a rack of 50 pistols, and then a wall of halberds, instead of the one of this, one of that, you might see in a museum. However, this certainly does not detract from the experience. The collection includes everything from huge two handed swords (Zweihänder), to incredibly ornate pistols (well worth checking out), to cannons, to a full suit of horse armour, to firearms that looked like rifles but were so large they were operated by a team of people and needed a stand. The whole armoury has relativley subdued lighting to preserve the collection. There are short guides in a range of languages and audio guides (sadly I did not have chance to make use of this as I only had an hour before closing- but certainly better than not seeing it at all!). I would have appreciated more notes/signs as a large amount of the collection is just there without information. If you are in Graz and want to see something a little different this is well worth it. Other practical things: there are toilets and a lift, plus quite a large shop
K R (19 months ago)
If I could use only one word to describe this place it would be - awesome! There are thousands of various pieces of armor, weaponry and other military artifacts to admire, a dream come true for any history buff. We even got to see the famous horse armor (the guide kindly asked us to keep our pictures for private use, so I'll respect their request, but there are plenty of pictures of it online). Armory is accessible only via guided tour, but it's well worth the admission fee (12 EUR for adults).
andrei radulescu (20 months ago)
Biggest standing armory in the world. Nice place to see
Gilbert Fruhwirth (21 months ago)
Absolutely unique collection of war equipment from the middle ages! There is nothing comparable worldwide! A must-see for every tourist visiting Austria. Easy to reach in the city centre of Graz. Guides available, Audio-Guides, too. Museum shop available. Wheel-chair and push-chair accessible.
ugnius ugnisu (2 years ago)
Amazing place. Come in summer or spring though. Learned a new German expression - "I smell the match"
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