Ohlsdorf Cemetery

Hamburg, Germany

Ohlsdorf Cemetery is the fourth-largest cemetery in the world. Most of the people buried at the cemetery are civilians, but there is also a large number of victims of war from various nations. It was established in 1877 as a non-denominational and multi-regional burial site outside of Hamburg. The cemetery has an area of 391 hectares (966 acres) with 12 chapels, over 1.5 million burials in more than 280,000 burial sites and streets with a length of 17 km.

During World War I over 400 Allied prisoners-of-war who died in German captivity were buried here in, as well as sailors whose bodies had been washed ashore the Frisian Islands. In 1923 the remains of British Commonwealth servicemen from 120 burial grounds in north-western Germany were brought to Hamburg. Further dead Commonwealth soldiers of World War II and of the post war period were buried here too.

There are six memorial sites for the victims of the Nazi era. The remains of some 38,000 victims of Operation Gomorrha, the bombing campaign that took place from July 24 to August 3, 1943, lie in a cross-shaped, landscaped mass grave.

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Details

Founded: 1877
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aslam Shah (11 months ago)
Well maintained, beautiful and peaceful place to visit and give respect to the ones who are not here anymore. The cemetery park is very good for jogging and taking a stroll. Becareful if you are visiting for the first time and without your phone during closing time , you might find it difficult to find your way out. It happened to me
Javier Aviles Chico (11 months ago)
Respectful and wonderful place to honor those who are not here any more.
Natalie Otto (12 months ago)
What an amazing and beautiful place!
Jo Jo (16 months ago)
Very beautiful place, but why aren't dogs allowed? There drive even busses, cars, bikes, so it is not really quiet and all the gooses, swans, birds make dirt also. Besides you have to remove dirt that the dog makes. So this is something that really annoys meand I can not understand and I'd like to hear an answer. Can't dogs be allowed as long as they are at the leash and at the main way?
Kakhaber Samkurashvili (19 months ago)
Astonishing and surreal place Hard to call this place a cemetery, as it's huge park, proper for walking, riding a bike or whatever you want. I was amazed when I walked there. Totally recommended, as you hardly find any other place similar to Ohlsdorf cemetery.
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