Hamburg Town Hall

Hamburg, Germany

Hamburg Town Hall was built from 1886 to 1897 and with its impressive architecture dominates the centre of the city. The magnificent sandstone building houses the city's senate and parliament.

On the outside the architectural style is neo-renaissance, which is abandoned inside for several historical elements. It is one of the few completely preserved buildings of historicism in Hamburg. Built in a period of wealth and prosperity, in which the Kingdom of Prussia and its confederates defeated France in the Franco-German War and the German Empire was formed, the look of the new Hamburg Rathaus was intended to express this wealth and also the independence of the State of Hamburg and Hamburg's republican traditions.

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Details

Founded: 1886-1897
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniel Monteiro (18 months ago)
Do yourself a favour and take the 1 hr tour for 5 euro.. Our tour guide was fantastic and we were blown away by the opulence of the various rooms.
Andrew Lewis (19 months ago)
A beautiful building which is worth a visit. The area around has shops and stalls also worth visiting.
Corissa George (20 months ago)
Really enjoyed our day trip to Hamburg in April 2017. It was easy to get around & there was so much to see/do. I loved how it was just surrounded with water, always to be seen no matter where one looked. Clean city with beautiful architecture & history. Ontario, Canada
Hans Hansen (20 months ago)
In the backyard of the townhouse you find this demonstration of power based on financial success. Sit down and meditate a while about your personal values and how to save the world from corruption. Then keep walking and do good without so much empty talking about the failures of others. Enjoy!
Goh Ah (2 years ago)
Take the guided tour at 5€ to see the beautiful oak furnishings and rooms, pictures cannot do honors to the rooms, see for yourself!!! Great view of the Christmas Markets from rooms as well.
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