Taagepera Church

Helme, Estonia

The Lutheran St. John’s Church was built in 1674 by the owner of near Taagepera manor. The church is made of stone, but has a wooden tower.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Taagepera, Helme, Estonia
See all sites in Helme

Details

Founded: 1674
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Swedish Empire (Estonia)

More Information

www.7is7.com

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kati Tähe (2 years ago)
rs agarwaen (2 years ago)
Anatoly Ko (7 years ago)
Kirikuküla, Helme, Valgamaa, 57.995388, 25.882070 ‎ 57° 59' 43.40", 25° 52' 55.45" Первое упоминание датировано 1383 годом. В начале 17 века, во время воин, церковь была разрушена. 1674-ым годом датированы сведения о реставрации церкви. Во время Северной войны, 13. 07. 1702 года, после сражения при Хуммули, войска царя Петра I, подожгли церковь Хельме. Последствия пожара были разрушительными, осыпались даже сводчатые потолки. В 20-ые годы 18 века началось строительство церкви Маарья. Вместо сводчатых потолков появился обычный деревянный потолок, кроме этого, была пристроена деревянная башня. В 1900 году в Таллинне был отлит колокол под руководством Ц. Юргенса и Ко. Последний алтарь был деревянным и довольно простым, алтарь был построен в 80-ых годах 19 века. В 1944 году, во время Второй мировой войны, башня церкви Хельме использовалась немецкими и русскими войсками. 16 сентября 1944 года, церкоь была разрушена снарядами красной армии. 21 сентября на церковь упал один из немецких снарядов. Снаряд взорвался в том месте, где находился орган. 4 сентября упала башня, обвалилась крыша, а также разрушилась одна из стен. С этого времени, от церкви остались лишь развалины, церковь больше не восстанавливалась.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Externsteine Stones

The Externsteine (Extern stones) is a distinctive sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest, near the town of Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation is a tor consisting of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. Archaeological excavations have yielded some Upper Paleolithic stone tools dating to about 10,700 BC from 9,600 BC.

In a popular tradition going back to an idea proposed to Hermann Hamelmann in 1564, the Externsteine are identified as a sacred site of the pagan Saxons, and the location of the Irminsul (sacral pillar-like object in German paganism) idol reportedly destroyed by Charlemagne; there is however no archaeological evidence that would confirm the site's use during the relevant period.

The stones were used as the site of a hermitage in the Middle Ages, and by at least the high medieval period were the site of a Christian chapel. The Externsteine relief is a medieval depiction of the Descent from the Cross. It remains controversial whether the site was already used for Christian worship in the 8th to early 10th centuries.

The Externsteine gained prominence when Völkisch and nationalistic scholars took an interest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This interest peaked under the Nazi regime, when the Externsteine became a focus of nazi propaganda. Today, they remain a popular tourist destination and also continue to attract Neo-Pagans and Neo-Nazis.