Taagepera Church

Helme, Estonia

The Lutheran St. John’s Church was built in 1674 by the owner of near Taagepera manor. The church is made of stone, but has a wooden tower.

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Taagepera, Helme, Estonia
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Details

Founded: 1674
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Swedish Empire (Estonia)

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3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kati Tähe (3 years ago)
rs agarwaen (3 years ago)
Anatoly Ko (8 years ago)
Kirikuküla, Helme, Valgamaa, 57.995388, 25.882070 ‎ 57° 59' 43.40", 25° 52' 55.45" Первое упоминание датировано 1383 годом. В начале 17 века, во время воин, церковь была разрушена. 1674-ым годом датированы сведения о реставрации церкви. Во время Северной войны, 13. 07. 1702 года, после сражения при Хуммули, войска царя Петра I, подожгли церковь Хельме. Последствия пожара были разрушительными, осыпались даже сводчатые потолки. В 20-ые годы 18 века началось строительство церкви Маарья. Вместо сводчатых потолков появился обычный деревянный потолок, кроме этого, была пристроена деревянная башня. В 1900 году в Таллинне был отлит колокол под руководством Ц. Юргенса и Ко. Последний алтарь был деревянным и довольно простым, алтарь был построен в 80-ых годах 19 века. В 1944 году, во время Второй мировой войны, башня церкви Хельме использовалась немецкими и русскими войсками. 16 сентября 1944 года, церкоь была разрушена снарядами красной армии. 21 сентября на церковь упал один из немецких снарядов. Снаряд взорвался в том месте, где находился орган. 4 сентября упала башня, обвалилась крыша, а также разрушилась одна из стен. С этого времени, от церкви остались лишь развалины, церковь больше не восстанавливалась.
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