Tolmin Castle Ruins

Tolmin, Slovenia

Tolmin Castle was first mentioned in 1188, and its chapel of Saint Martin in 1194. The east and north towers appear to have formed the original core of the fortress; another two hexagonal towers were added later. The north tower had an extensive basement for the storage of provisions, which along with two wells and rainwater cisterns allowed for the withstanding of sieges.

The castle was held in fief by a long series of masters: the Patriarchate of Aquileia, the Counts of Gorizia, the city of Cividale del Friuli, the Venetian Republic, and finally the Habsburgs. It appears to have functioned as a dedicated fortress rather than a residence, and had no permanent civilian population in peacetime, only a large garrison; it also housed a prison. The structure was severely damaged in the earthquakes of 1348 and 1511, but was repaired each time. It was finally abandoned in 1651 by its last owners, the Coronnini family, for a new manor in Tolmin itself, though it remained sufficiently intact by 1713 to play a role in the great peasant revolt of that year. The castle is currently in ruins, though parts of it have been restored.

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Tolmin, Slovenia
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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovenia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dino Chirumbolo (11 months ago)
This hill, with a pleasant view of Tolmin, is reacheble via a dirt path, which can also be used by non-experts. It's about 30-40 minutes of walking.
Žiga Fišter (12 months ago)
Amazing view
Thomas Kolde (12 months ago)
Very beautiful view of the valley and not full with tourists. But be warned, the climb is steep, so be prepared.
Eva Kaplan (13 months ago)
Beautiful Place with a great view and a nice family hike towards it!
Nir Dahan (2 years ago)
Great view of the Tolmin area. Nice hike in the shade to the top of the hill. Good to fill a 2h slot (45 min each way, easy walk from tolmin center and 30 min on top) in the afternoon
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