Udine Castle

Udine, Italy

The Udine castle hill is made of drift accumulating during centuries. However, a legend about its origin says that when Attila the Hun (also called the Scourge of God) plundered Aquileia (one of the biggest cities of the Roman Empire at that time) in the year 452, he asked his soldiers to build a hill to see the Aquileia burning. This was made by filling the helmet of each soldier with ground.

The first official statement of the existence of a building on the hill dates back to 983: the Holy Roman Emperor Otto II donated to Rodoaldo, Patriarch of Aquileia a castrum, a military building.

The present building has the form of a palace and it was built on the ruins of a fortress destroyed in the year 1511 Idrija earthquake. The construction had started in 1517 and the works had lasted for 50 years. The external decoration of the palace and the paintings in the Parliament Hall are due to Giovanni da Udine, one of the pupils of Raphael.

The council of the Patria del Friuli was one of the first parliaments in the world, and it was suppressed after the French occupation in 1797.

Today the castle hosts the History and Art Museum of the City of Udine.

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Founded: 1511
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Schankel Fredy (2 months ago)
I am from Austria and I love the Udine City and this castle. What a beautiful place. I was absoluty suprised about it.
Stamatis Kon (3 months ago)
Nice view of the city and the surrounding mountains. The museums are also interesting. Worth a visit...
Coen (3 months ago)
Nice views, good looking castle. The museum was free and quite interesting but not really one you cannot miss.
Elizabeth Hall (4 months ago)
Not what we were expecting as a "castle" per se but very cool city center area with tons of old buildings and bell towers. Would like to see more next time we go.
Suthinee Nualmusing (5 months ago)
Nice place, in the top you can see view and sunset also have bar and restaurant you can enjoy there.
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