Miramare Castle

Grignano, Italy

Miramare Castle and its park were built by order of Ferdinand Maximilian of Habsburg (1832–1867). He was the younger brother of Franz Joseph, Emperor of Austria and later the only monarch of the Second Mexican Empire. In 1850, at the age of eighteen, Maximilian came to Trieste with his brother Charles and, immediately afterwards, he set off on a short cruise toward the Near East. This journey confirmed his intention to sail and to get to know the world. He decided to move to Trieste and to have a home built facing the sea and surrounded by a park worthy of his name and rank.

The castle's grounds include an extensive cliff and seashore park of 22 hectares designed by the archduke. The grounds were completely re-landscaped to feature numerous tropical species of trees and plants.

Designed in 1856 by Carl Junker, an Austrian architect, the architectural structure of Miramare was finished in 1860. The style reflects the artistic interests of the archduke, who was acquainted with the eclectic architectural styles of Austria, Germany and England.

On the ground floor, destined for the use of Maximilian and his wife, Charlotte of Belgium, worthy of note are the bedroom and the archduke’s office, which reproduce the cabin and the stern wardroom respectively of the frigate Novara, the war-ship used by Maximilian when he was Commander of the Navy to circumnavigate the world between 1857 and 1859. All the rooms still feature the original furnishings, ornaments, furniture and objects dating back to the middle of the 19th century. Many coats of arms of the Second Mexican Empire decorate the castle, as well as stone ornamentations on the exterior depicting the Aztec eagle.

The first floor includes guest reception areas and the Throne Room. Of note are the magnificent panelling on the ceiling and walls and the Chinese and Japanese drawing-rooms with their oriental furnishings. Of particular interest is the room decorated with paintings by Cesare Dell’Acqua, portraying events in the life of Maximilian and the history of Miramare. Currently, the rooms in the castle are mostly arranged according to the original layout decided upon by the royal couple. A valuable photographic reportage commissioned by the archduke himself made accurate reconstruction possible.

Nowadays to visit the castle is to experience the fascination of life in the middle of the 19th century in a residence that has remained largely intact and which gives the visitor an insight into the personality of Maximilian.

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Details

Founded: 1856-1860
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Phil Hardwick (15 months ago)
This is the best approach stop to the wonderful city of Trieste. The views are amazing, just see the photos. It has the real feel of a Fairy tale Castle just outside the city. The cosmopolitan, hard to define, but delightful Trieste. I recommend making this stop with some one you love :-)
Kiran T (16 months ago)
Wonderfull place.. cleanly maintained... there are good descriptions to understand things... site map is available in all junctions.. good to spend one evening with stunning visuals of park and sea merged with fogg...
Irina Kravchuk (2 years ago)
Very beautiful place, must-see in Trieste. Very nice park with fountains, sculptures - entrance to the park is free. You can get here by a bus 6 or 36 from Trieste (terminal station). Amazing castle overlooking the sea is the core of this park.
Mojcej Vodopivec (2 years ago)
Worth visiting and revisiting at any season. The park is free of charge and if you buy the ticket to go inside the castle the park is obviously included. Although many people visit the castle everyday the park is always peaceful. If you wish to bring your dog with you there's no problem if you are just visiting the garden, but be prepared to encounter other dog walkers. Overall would 100% reccomend visiting, even for a quick visit.
ASHISH VYAS (2 years ago)
Nice castle to visit... Superb place to visit with family and friends. Situated at good location, well build, well maintained and not much crowded. Crowd is moderate so one can enjoy the natural beauty as well as architectural beauty of this castel. A good sea view and well maintained garden was there for some memorable pics. Overall a nice place to visit.
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