St. Leonard's Church

Zoutleeuw, Belgium

The Saint Leonard's Church in Zoutleeuw stands on the former site of a Romanesque chapel erected in 1125 by Benedictines from Vlierbeek Abbey near Leuven. Construction of the present church began around 1231, and additions continued into the 16th century. Rendered mainly in the Gothic style, the building in its oldest parts shows traces of the Romanesque.

The two heavy square towers flanking the west facade are connected with each other by means of a gallery over the nave. The slender central tower, octagonal in cross-section, contains a carillon with 24 bells. Since 1999, this church with its towers has been part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site 'Belfries of Belgium and France'.

Few if any other medieval churches in Belgium remain in such an excellent state of preservation as St. Leonard's, which stayed clear of the widespread iconoclasm during the Protestant Reformation. It also survived the French Revolution intact, because three canons took an oath of allegiance to the French regime. The interior thus offers an authentic glimpse of how the churches of Brabant were furnished centuries ago.

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Spottinghistory.com team said 4 months ago
Hi Frans, we are sorry for founding your photos on our website without a proper license. This image link is now removed and we checked there are no more images used from your Flickr account ("Frans.Sellies"). This is related to old problem where site was not able to check proper licenses when adding photos.

Frans Sellies said 4 months ago
Please buy my photo, instead of stealing it. Just mentioning that I have copyright is not enough ! I stated clearly enough on my Flickr page: © All rights reserved. Use without permission is illegal. Unauthorized use, copy, editing, reproduction, publication, duplication and distribution of my photos, or any portion of them, is not allowed. You can purchase the photo here: https://www.gettyimages.nl/detail/foto/the-church-of-zoutleeuw-belgium-royalty-free-beeld/497363747


Details

Founded: 1231
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jente Michel (21 months ago)
Dj DubbelDekker (2 years ago)
Bidden bidden en nig eens bidden! Mooie kerk!
Martin Lamboo (2 years ago)
Bijzonder grote en mooie gotische kerk - zeker voor zo'n klein plaatsje als #Zoutleeuw. Je kunt er het belang en de rijkdom van Zoutleeuw in de middeleeuwen uit afleiden. Kerk heeft een bijzonder rijk en goed bewaard interieur, omdat ze niet getroffen is door de beeldenstorm, noch te lijden heeft gehad van de vernielingen door de Franse revolutionaire troepen. Beslist een omweg waard!
Viviane Es (2 years ago)
Te bezoeken door elke historicus en liefhebbers van het nationaal patrimonium.
Paul Van Bladel (2 years ago)
Prachtige gotische kerk. Pièce unique. Vaut le detour. Dit is een absolute top 5 locatie in België. Brugge heeft meer dan zoutleeuw maar geen Sint Leonarduskerk.
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