Affligem Abbey, dedicated in 1086, was the most important monastery in the Duchy of Brabant. The abbey of Affligem was probably founded in 1062 by six hermits, a group of knights who repented of their violent way of life. Hermann II, Count Palatine of Lotharingia (1061–1085) and his guardian, Anno II, archbishop of Cologne (d. 1075) are considered official founders. The count Palatine donated the land on which to build the abbey church. The first St Peterchurch was erected in 1083. The Rule of St Benedict was adopted in 1085 and the abbey was dedicated in 1086.

The counts of Brabant, also counts of Leuven, became their protectors (Vögte) in 1085/1086. A number of their family members are buried in the abbey church.

During the 12th century, the abbey became known for its strict observance of the discipline of the Cluniac reforms. One notable monk during this period was John Cotton, whose treatise 'De musica' (c. 1100-1121) is one of the earliest of musical theses, covering the ecclesiastical use of monody in the organum and the roots of polyphony.

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux visited Affligem in 1146, where he is said to have had a vision of the Blessed Virgin, in memory of which he gave the abbey his staff and chalice, which are still preserved in the abbey today.

Another eminent monk of this period was Jan of Afflighem, Jan van Ruusbroec's Good Cook in the Victorine monastery of Groenendaal, near Brussels, whose importance in the survival of theology in the wake of the Black Death is understated, as his theological thinking strongly influenced Gerard Groot, who taught Thomas à Kempis.

Several monasteries, among them Maria Laach Abbey in Germany, were founded by the monks of Affligem.

In 1523, Affligem joined the Bursfelde Congregation, a union of Benedictine monasteries formed in the 15th century for the stricter observance of the Benedictine rule. In 1569, the Archbishop of Mechelen became commendatory abbot and exercised his authority through a dean, an institution that lasted until the dissolution of the abbey in 1796.

Archbishop Jacob Boonen introduced the Monte Cassino observance. At his insistence, the Prior of Affligem, Benedict van Haeften, founded in 1627 a new congregation, B. M. V. in Templo Praesentat, which included Affligem and several other Belgian monasteries. It was dissolved in 1654.

In 1796, during the French occupation, the monks were dismissed, part of the buildings destroyed and the lands confiscated. The last dean, Beda Regaus, preserved the miraculous image of Our Lady, as well as the staff and chalice of Saint Bernard. These came into the possession of a Benedictine monk, Veremund Daens, who in 1838 established a new foundation at Dendermonde.

In 1869/70, the abbey of Affligem was re-established. It is now a member of the Flemish Province of the Subiaco Congregation within the Benedictine Confederation.

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Founded: 1062
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

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User Reviews

Seppe Engels (2 years ago)
He attack he protec but most importantly he barrac
Giulia (2 years ago)
This complex is full of history and somehow you can tell. It is on a gentle hill, in the middle of the countryside. Visible from many different places around, it was nice coming to it walking from the village of Affligem and leaving it behind disappearing into the nature and paths just in front. In fact, such lovely and relaxing walks are possible here.
bjorn527 (2 years ago)
Great location for hosting a camp or even a party for a big group. The accommodation is great just like the buildings inside. Its a bit closed off but that might even add to the place own unique feeling. A beautiful little garden here too.
Maarten Aerts (3 years ago)
We stayed at the 'jeugdheem'. Nice accomodation. Beds are a bit old, but definitely doable. Kitchen, appliances and space were great! The grassland at the back is nice too. Friendly and hospitable monks - we even got to sing in their chapel on Saturday - with delicious beer!
Rob C.E. Macaré (4 years ago)
Super!
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