The Classicist main building of the Õisu Manor was built at the turn of the 18th and 19th centuries. The wide and high parade staircase with sculptures of white marble makes the mansion impressive; one of the sculptures is a Protege of Home, the other one symbolizes Power. Many outbuildings belong to the Manor Ensemble, of which one of the most interesting one is the so-called "wry stable". There is an English-style park, one of the first in Estonia, behind the main building.

There has been a Õisu dairy school since 1922. At present school provides training in dairy work and other branches of food processing.

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Details

Founded: 1760-1767
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tiiu Piir (13 months ago)
Kàisime suveteatri etendust vaatamas Òisu mòisas. Meeldiv koht soovitan teistele ka kùlastada Òisu mòisat.
Raju (13 months ago)
Väga ilus mõis ja see maja tagant vaade Õisu järvele see on ikka tõesti vaatamist väärt kogemus
Marcus Turovski (18 months ago)
One of my favorite manors in Estonia!
Andrei J (2 years ago)
Interesting arhitecture but cant get inside of manor
Aulo Aasmaa (3 years ago)
Nice renovations in place, still lots of work ahead, but nevertheless worth visiting. Will be a nice manor for weddings and other events when finished. Also has a nice trekking path nearby with a possibility for swimming etc.
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