Château d'Agel

Agel, France

Château d'Agel was first mentioned in 1100. In the early 12th century the area was rocked by the scandal of the Cathar Wars or Albigensian Crusade. A local form of Christianity was becoming ever more popular and according to some had already become the majority religion of the area. The Catholic Church regarded it as both a heresy and a threat. The 'heresy' was strongest in the county of Toulouse and all over Languedoc, where vassals of the Count of Toulouse refortified a line of castles to protect themselves against Papal forces. Agel was one of that line of castles refortified to resist the Pope's forces.

The Crusade against the Cathars, led by Simon de Montfort, raged throughout the Languedoc. In Simon's bid to take nearby Minerve in 1210, the château d'Agel was almost entirely destroyed by fire. In July of that year, Minerve fell, and the 180 Cathars who had taken refuge there met their end on a burning pyre.

The Treaty of Paris, which annexed Languedoc to France in 1220, put an end to the Crusade. Guiraud de Pépieux, who had escaped the massacre, set about restoring the château for his descendants. Notarial records dating back to the year 1300 mention another Guillaume de Pépieux as Lord of Aigues-Vives and Agel.

The architecture of the Château d'Agel reflects its continued use over the centuries. Thus for example window styles, vary from the tiny windows of the stark 12th century fortress to the beautiful windows of the Renaissance with ornamental balusters and capitals. During the 17th century, Renaissance embrasures were replaced on the principal frontage by broad bays with small squares in the style of Trianon.

By the first half of the 20th century, the Château had fallen into disrepair, and the northern wing in particular had become a ruin. In the 1960s the Ecal family began the task of restoring the property and its gardens to their former glory. Today Château d'Agel is a grand hotel.

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Address

Place du Château 6, Agel, France
See all sites in Agel

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Guillaume Barles (4 months ago)
Charming village of Minervois
Jean-Pierre Grousseau (11 months ago)
Super welcome the lady and the lady welcome you with kindness and the rooms very well. So come
Sam Hamilton (2 years ago)
Went for sister's wedding, was fantastic. Amazing venue!
Arnaud Fernandez (2 years ago)
Nous avons passé un excellent séjour au château dans la suite! Très confortable, très spacieuse la chambre comme la salle de bains nous ont plongés à l époque des chevaliers et damoiselles. La décoration est soignée, le parc et ses buis très parfumés nous délassent encore plus. Nous y avons séjourné en plein hiver. En été, le ravissement des sens doit être encore plus prenant ! Le repas était digne d une table gastro etoilee. Les propriétaires sont exquis , on prolongerait aussi le séjour pour continuer à discuter avec eux devant le feu de cheminée . .. Ne pas oublier de déguster le vin du domaine...
Atelier Nomade Traiteur événements (3 years ago)
Lieu de réception magique plein d'histoire et de sensualité. Le gros plus les propriétaires sont adorables
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