The Château Comtal (Count’s Castle) is a medieval castle within the Cité of Carcassonne, the largest city in Europe with its city walls still intact. The Château Comtal has a strong claim to be called a 'Cathar Castle'. When the Catholic Crusader army arrived in 1209 they first attacked Raymond-Roger Trencavel's castrum at Bèziers and then moved on to his main stronghold at Carcassonne.

The castle with rectangular shape is separated from the city by a deep ditch and defended by two barbicans. There are six towers curtain walls.

The castle was restored in 1853 by the architect Eugène Viollet-le-Duc. It was added to the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites in 1997.

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Details

Founded: c. 1130
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Soheil (37 days ago)
Carcassonne castle is such an amazing place to visit and spend some time there with family, partner, alone, etc! Entrance fee for adults is 9-euro. First Sundays of each month is free. Everything about this historic castle is fantastic.
Sergio Franco (40 days ago)
Worth the visit to complement and give some context to the city around it. A good source of information on the history of the city. Make sure you take the exit through the ramparts as it provides both great views of the city as well as from the town below.
Catarina Barros (40 days ago)
Beautiful! Getting the audio guide was good, however we were a little unlucky and one of them had a loose speaker which made it nearly impossible to understand. (tip: apparently you can get an official guide on the app store for the same price) The castle is really well kept and wasn't busy, which was a pleasant surprise. If you're considering a visit make sure you wrap up nicely! The winds can be quite strong.
Oluchi Onuorah (42 days ago)
I really liked this castle. It is really big, lots of stores inside and also places to eat. You'll feel as though you're on the set of a medieval movie
z k (4 months ago)
This is the place to go for walking on the city walls! Many excellent views. Bring your camera! The audio tour of the castle is also excellent.
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