The Château Comtal (Count’s Castle) is a medieval castle within the Cité of Carcassonne, the largest city in Europe with its city walls still intact. The Château Comtal has a strong claim to be called a 'Cathar Castle'. When the Catholic Crusader army arrived in 1209 they first attacked Raymond-Roger Trencavel's castrum at Bèziers and then moved on to his main stronghold at Carcassonne.

The castle with rectangular shape is separated from the city by a deep ditch and defended by two barbicans. There are six towers curtain walls.

The castle was restored in 1853 by the architect Eugène Viollet-le-Duc. It was added to the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites in 1997.

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Details

Founded: c. 1130
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ian Woolley (12 months ago)
Awesome place. Really busy, when I came out of season it was better, but I loved it.
Elmar Zwart (13 months ago)
A beautiful and a must to visit, when you are in Carcassonne. We took the route that goes to the right, which is better/nicer for children.
Alan K (17 months ago)
Loved it well worth a visit. Spent over two hours walking around and paid the extra for the audio guide. So much history to get lost in and you can spend hours here if you wished. Also nice little beer garden on the right when you finish the tour.
Angelo Vassallo (19 months ago)
Spectacular and really big! Take your time to visit it. View spectacular from its top and place full of history. One of the best castle complexes in Europe
Neha Dogra (19 months ago)
Drove to this castle all the way from Barcelona on my vacation. This castle has a breathtaking view from above! I went during off season to avoid large crowds which was a plus since there was barely anyone visiting. This castle has such deep history of the past so it made it even more intriguing to see. I recommend this castle to everyone!
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