The St. Mary’s Church in Rõuge was originally built in 1550, but it was damaged badly in the Great Northern War. The present church was reconstructed in 1730’s. In 1854 the church obtained its organ and the altar picture of 'Christ on the cross' by R. von Mühlen.

In 1860 the building was completely renovated, with the walls being made higher and a mirrored arch installed. The Kriisa brothers donated a 31-register organ they had built to the church in 1930. The first Estonian pastor in Rõuge was Rudolf Gottfried Kallas.

References:
  • Tapio Mäkeläinen 2005. Viro - kartanoiden, kirkkojen ja kukkaketojen maa. Tammi, Helsinki, Finland.
  • Visit Estonia

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Võru mnt 1-3, Rõuge, Estonia
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Founded: 1730's
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

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www.visitestonia.com

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Artur Rahula (14 months ago)
a jv asides (6 years ago)
Anatoly Ko (7 years ago)
Rõuge kirik, Rõuge, Võrumaa, 57.731060, 26.928526 ‎57° 43' 51.82", 26° 55' 42.69" Первая каменная церковь была построена в Рыуге в 16- столетии. В 1730 году вместо разрушенной в ходе Северной войны церкви была построена новая, посвященная Пресвятой Деве Марии церковь с великолепной четырехугольной башней. В церкви в 1854 году был установлен орган, тогда же здесь появилась алтарная картина фон Мюлена «Иисус на кресте». В 1860 году был произведен капитальный ремонт здания церкви. Были надстроены стены, и церковь получила зеркальный свод. В 1930 году в церкви Рыуге был установлен 31-регистровый орган работы братьев Крийза. Первым пастором из эстонцев в Рыуге был Рудольф Готтфрид Каллас.
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