Ambrussum is a Roman archaeological site in Villetelle. Ambrussum is notable for its museum, staging post on the Via Domitia, bridge Pont Ambroix over the Vidourle and the oppidum (fortified village). Its history of settlement spanned 400 years.

The whole site is still being excavated. A lower settlement prone to flooding was a staging post for travellers on the Via Domitia and provided stabling and accommodation and the full range of repair facilities that were needed by carts and the Imperial postal service. The higher settlement was based on a pre-Roman oppidum which was within a surrounding wall including 21 towers. The Romans re-modelled the oppidum, so there is evidence of a complete range of housing styles from the earliest one room dwellings to sophisticated courtyard houses on the second century AD.

The Roman road, the Via Domitia, ran at the foot of the settlement, leading from it is a paved road with visible with traces of Roman chariot tracks. The Roman bridge was used until the Middle Ages but fell into disrepair, and only one complete arch remains.

The site was first settled in 2,300 BC and the construction started on the oppidum around 300 BC. It was a settlement of Gauls. The Romans conquered the area in 120 BC. The paved road at the heart of the oppidum was laid around 100 BC. The staging post on the Via Domitia and the Pont Ambroix were constructed at around 30 BC. The flow patterns of the river changed around 10 BC, it became more aggressive and flooding became more frequent. The large houses on the south of the oppidum were built in AD 50. The whole oppidum abandoned in AD 100, but parts of the lower settlement were still in use in AD 400, and the Pont Ambroix continued in use through the Middle Ages.

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Details

Founded: 300 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Arrival of Celts (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cathy Brandome (20 months ago)
Super : il y a ce fantastique pont romain, la très belle rue pavée, le relais routier romain. L'oppidum est pas mal non plus mais garder un plan sur soi et éviter d'y aller en plein été !
Francis PAPET (2 years ago)
pont ambroix
Llaa Saiel (2 years ago)
Interesting Aerea. Entry is free! Superb little Museum there. The site is a must for people with Interess of old Roman Citys.
Jeroen Mourik (3 years ago)
We were disappointed with the museum, but loved the peaceful area by the river next to the ruins of the Roman bridge.
Phillip Spencer (3 years ago)
Excellent site, well cared for and preserved. Allow a good hour or two to walk round all of it. Be aware there is very little shade if hot and sunny so hats and water recommended. There is a good museum (includes info in English), a gift shop and drinks available. Good loos too. Some guided tours.
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