Arles Roman Theatre

Arles, France

Arles Roman Theatre was built in the time of Augustus and. It had a capacity of seating for 8,000 on 33 tiers of steps. In the early Middle Ages the theater was used as a quarry, and with the material it provided the town wall was erected. Of the rear wall of the stage only a few stumps of pillars and two more or less complete columns remain. Since the theater is now used again during the summer it is protected on the outside by screens and the interior is somewhat spoiled by the necessary technical apparatus.

Most of the relics brought to light during excavation can be seen in the Arles Museum of Antiquity - the most important of these is the 'Venus of Arles', a representation of the goddess Diana, which was discovered near a fountain in 1651 and is now in the Louvre in Paris.

The Roman Theater has been listed as World Heritage Sites since 1981. Arles Roman Theater is now a monument to visit and a place of concerts and events.

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Details

Founded: 90 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Phillipe Denny (13 months ago)
Wonderful Roman amphitheatre. Worth paying the money and going inside. Stunning concert arena. We had a guide to make the most of the experience. Lovely Sunny day. Combine it with a picnic
Jacob SungIn Hong (14 months ago)
This venue is so beautiful and you can see the ancient Roman. I'd like to see a concert here.
Paula Ulyatt (2 years ago)
Worth a visit rather than look through gates. Remains of lots of decorative stone in a variety of designs to view at the back.
Phillip Spencer (2 years ago)
Very nice Roman remains of the old theatre. Well worth a look. If you don't want to pay admission for a wander round then it is possible to view the overall structure from the outside in various places. It is great that this is still actively used for shows and is not just a museum piece!
Jeffrey Edison (2 years ago)
This place is a nice (short) visit but an incredible venue for a concert. Arrive early to grab good seats in the middle, in the first couple of rows (but NOT the first row), sit back and enjoy. With luck, you can grab something cold to drink at the Theater's bar.
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