St. Trophime Church

Arles, France

The Church of St. Trophime (Trophimus) is former cathedral built between the 12th century and the 15th century in the city centre of Arles. According to legend, Trophimus of Arles becomes the first bishop of Arles around 250 AD.

The church was built upon the site of the 5th century basilica of Arles, named for St. Stephen. The apse and the transept were probably built first, in the late 11th century, and the nave and bell tower were completed in the second quarter of the 12th century. The Romaneque church had a long central nave 20 meters high. The windows are small and high up on the nave, above the level of the collateral aisles. In the 15th century a Gothic choir was added to the Romanesque nave.

St. Trophime is an important example of Romanesque architecture, and the sculptures over the portal, particularly the Last Judgement, and the columns in the adjacent cloister, are considered some of the finest examples of Romanesque sculpture.

Though mainly notable for its outstanding Romanesque architecture and sculpture, the church contains rich groups of art from other periods. These include several important carved Late Roman sarcophagi, reliquaries from various periods, and Baroque paintings, with three by Louis Finson. Trophime Bigot is also represented, and there are several Baroque tapestries, including a set of ten on the Life of the Virgin. The church has been used to hold items originally from other churches or religious houses in the region that were dispersed in the French Revolution or at other times.

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Details

Founded: c. 1100
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hans-Georg Pagendarm (6 months ago)
a Must See. Appreachiate the antique sarcophagi!
Clodagh (7 months ago)
A wonderful escape from the heat of the sun into this historic church.
Elizabeth Page (10 months ago)
Nice large church
JungWon Kim (10 months ago)
must visit place. so beautiful
David P (14 months ago)
Beautiful church that apparently began construction in the 12th century. Many of the tapestries appear quite faded but I think that adds to the charm and history. There is actually a huge collection of relics locked away in a church alcove behind metal bars. Otherwise, as with many other churches in France, there are tons of statues and paintings depicting stardard components of Christianity. Very beautiful.
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