Saint-Papoul Abbey Church

Saint-Papoul, France

Situated on the eastern side of the Pays Lauragais, the ancient fortified city of Saint Papoul has conserved its medieval style with its lanes of half-timbered houses. The abbey is to one side of the village, at its southern entrance.

Founded during the 8th century, the Benedictine Abbey is closely linked to the figure of Saint Papoul. This evangelist of the Lauragais, a disciple of Saint Sernin, Toulouse's first bishop, was probably martyred in the area.

However, thanks to Saint Berenger, the abbey became famous in the 11th century. The future Saint Berenger was a monk at Saint Papoul, where he led an exemplary life until his death. His burial place, said to be miraculous, attracted many pilgrims over a long period of time, resulting in prosperity for the abbey.

In 1119, the Abbey of Saint Papoul was the possession of the Abbey of Alet, at that time, very powerful. The golden age arrived during the 15th century, thanks to the creation of the bishopric of Saint Papoul by Pope Jean XXII, in 1317. The second Bishop of Saint Papoul, Raymond de Mostuejouls, wrote the statutes concerning the cathedral's chapter (1320).

Later, the abbey underwent several assaults such as plundering by mercenaries in 1361, or the anger of the Protestant troops in 1595. The bishops rapidly became concerned by the resulting degradation of the abbey. Pierre Soybert, who became bishop in 1426, renovated the totality of the buildings. Then, in the 17th and 18th centuries, the Episcopal Palace was built and many buildings were consolidated.

The cloister was seriously damaged during the French Revolution which also marked the end of the Saint Papoul bishopric. It was not until 1840 that restoration began. The abbey buildings remain and the former abbey church has become the parish church.

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Details

Founded: 8th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

christian soulie (19 months ago)
ces lieux sont magiques , ils dégagent une atmosphère de calme et de sérénité incroyable , mais aussi la nostalgie de mes jeunes années
laurent roux (20 months ago)
Sympathique lieu d'histoire, un cloître magnifique
Sarah Defossez Laroche (20 months ago)
Très beau site historique qui est tant bien que mal préservé du temps. Lieu de recueil et de méditation. J’ai beaucoup apprécié cette visite.
Christine Andron (2 years ago)
Très jolie village dommage l'abbaye était fermé réouverture le 1 février.
Quentin SCHAEFER (2 years ago)
Magnifique abbaye qui vaut de s'y arrêter et de la visiter. Le cadre y est paisible. La fiche explicative de la visite est bien faite et vous permet de comprendre l'histoire ce site. A faire absolument
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