Castres Cathedral

Castres, France

Castres Cathedral (Cathédrale Saint-Benoît de Castres), now the Roman Catholic church of Saint Benoît, was formerly the seat of the bishop of Castres, but the diocese was not restored after the French Revolution and was added by the Concordat of 1801 to the Archdiocese of Albi.

The first cathedral was built in the 14th century after the creation of the diocese of Castres in 1317, along with a number of other dioceses created in the region after the suppression of the Albigensians. It was destroyed during the French Wars of Religion.

The present building which replaced it was constructed in the 16th and 17th centuries.

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Details

Founded: 1624
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Juliana Hernández Rodríguez. (4 years ago)
A beautiful place, I give it 4 stars because it was under renovation and I couldn't fully appreciate it.
Candido Quezada (4 years ago)
The cathedral is beautiful but it was not easy to find the entrance.
Tristan F. (4 years ago)
Super welcoming
Alain Ragot (5 years ago)
Beautiful baroque style cathedral. It is impressive by its vast proportions. Inside the choir is remarkable with its four marble statues. Note also the picture of the resurrection of Christ.
Paul Cooper (5 years ago)
A magnificent religious edifice which can be appreciated by all.
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