Saint-Jacques Tower

Paris, France

Saint-Jacques Flamboyant Gothic tower is all that remains of the former 16th-century Church of Saint-Jacques-de-la-Boucherie, which was demolished in 1797, during the French Revolution, leaving only the tower. What remains of the destroyed church of St. Jacques La Boucherie is now considered a national historic landmark.

The tower's rich decoration reflects the wealth of its patrons, the wholesale butchers of the nearby Les Halles market. The masons in charge were Jean de Felin, Julien Ménart and Jean de Revier. It was built in 1509 to 1523, during the reign of King Francis I. With a dedication to Saint James the Greater, the ancient church and its landmark tower welcomed pilgrims setting out on the road that led to Tours and headed for the way of St James, which led to the major pilgrimage destination of Santiago de Compostela.

A relic of the saint preserved in the church linked it the more strongly and in modern times occasioned its listing in 1998 as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO among the sites and structures marking the the pilgrimage routes in France that led like tributaries of a great stream headed towards Santiago in the northwest of Spain.

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Address

Rue de Rivoli 39B, Paris, France
See all sites in Paris

Details

Founded: 1509-1523
Category: Religious sites in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

livia catalano (5 months ago)
Not very much know, interesting locate in the heart of Psris
BradJill Travels (6 months ago)
The Saint Jacques Tower (Tour Saint-Jacques) is a stand alone medieval structure 52 metres in height located within a small square by the same name in the middle of the 4th district along Rue de Rivoli. The tower was originally part of the Saint James of the butchers Church constructed between 1509-23. Unfortunately, the church was destroyed near the end of the 18th century and not rebuilt. What is left standing is this single tower structure. This is a peculiar but attractive tower, Flamboyant Gothic in style, it is worth spending a few minutes to view when passing through this area of the city. The tower is highly decorative from the base to the top, featuring various statues of saints, gargoyles and other elaborate ornamentation. There is also statue of 17th-century French mathematician, philosopher and physicist Blaise Pascal at the base of the tower that is interesting to see as well. Note: It seems you can arrange visits (€10 per person) within Saint Jacques Tower (Tour Saint-Jacques) during parts of the year. Unfortunately, the tower wasn't open on the days we passed by in late December so it would seem this may be a seasonal visitation option only at this time.
g v (7 months ago)
Always like that place. The gothic aspect, the lonely tower in the park... a bit of a quiet place in the crowded surroundings of Chatelet
Bramya Coury (7 months ago)
Saint-Jacques Tower is a 52-metre tower. It is all that remains of the former 16th-century Church of Saint-Jacques-de-la-Boucherie ("Saint James of the butchers"), which was demolished in 1797, during the Revolution, leaving only the tower. We couldnt get inside, u need to book the tour ahead with a private company....
Thais Avelino (8 months ago)
Sometimes you can go up there.. But you must have a group and time organized... It's weird.
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