Château de Lagarde

Lagarde, France

The Château de Lagarde is a ruined castle situated near the village of Lagarde. The first documented mention of Lagarde is from the 10th century. The first castle was a square tower with, in the corner, a circular covering tower, built in the 11th century. In the 12th century, four square towers were added as well as a rectangular gatehouse, the whole castle being linked by walls with arrowslits and crenellations.

Following the Albigensian Crusade, the castle was handed to the Lévis-Mirepoix family. In the 14th century, the structure underwent important alterations. Buildings were erected behind each façade, the roofs were raised, a drawbridge was built and the entry gate and building openings were modified. In the 16th century, a large hanging spiral staircase was built (1526) with a flamboyant Gothic vault. Also in this period, the castle was doubled in size with the addition of walls and vaults, a new moat was created with four circular bastions in the corners and the drawbridge entrance was also bastioned. 17th century modifications included the addition of monumental statues on the bastions and the staircase tower, the creation of an esplanade surrounded by fortifications in the south east, the replacement of the drawbridge by a stone bridge with a monumental gateway, and an access ramp leading from the village.

During the French Revolution, the castle was partially destroyed, but it remains today as a bold silhouette looking down over the valley. The ruins comprise several towers and curtain walls.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jon Rankin (2 months ago)
The summer marché gourmand is a good evening. Lots of people eating and drinking in the warm evening air. Choose an evening when they have fireworks and you will have a great time.
Brendan Speechley (2 months ago)
Closed down, despite Google saying it's open
Claire Baldwin (14 months ago)
Great setting with good old fashioned famy entertainment! Food cheap and cheerful. The modules were good at 7€ the large banquette.
Steffan James (15 months ago)
We went here on Bastille day, the National Holiday in France. There was a Medieval Spectacular put on in the evening.. the entry was free. Using the Chateux as the backdrop it really made an impressive sight, fire acrobatics, horse riders show their riding skills, jousting. Really impressive show and fireworks. Highly recommend, the kids and adults loved it.
AndresRafael StefaniSucre (16 months ago)
?The Château de Lagarde? The castle of Lagarde ⚫Located near the village of Lagarde, southeast of Mirepoix in the French département of Ariège. ⚫The first documented mention of Lagarde is from the 10th century. ⚫Château de Lagarde began as a medieval fortress and the castle was constructed on this site in the 11th century. ⚫In the 12th century, four square towers were added as well as a rectangular gatehouse. ⚫During the French Revolution, the castle was partially destroyed. ⚫In 1889 the castle was classed as a historic monument and in 1919 duke Antoine de Lévis-Mirepoix bought it then he sold it in the 1980s to a private individual. ⚫Since then there is an association that works to preserve the castle and share its history.
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