Vienna Central Cemetery

Vienna, Austria

The Vienna Central Cemetery (Wiener Zentralfriedhof) is one of the largest cemeteries in the world, largest by number of interred in Europe and most famous cemetery in Vienna. Unlike many others, the Vienna Central Cemetery is not one that has evolved slowly with the passing of time. The decision to establish a new, big cemetery for Vienna came in 1863 when it became clear that – due to industrialisation – the city's population would eventually increase to such an extent that the existing communal cemeteries would prove insufficient.

The cemetery was opened on All Saints' Day in 1874, far outside Vienna's city borders. Today there are over 330,000 graves.

The church in the centre of the cemetery is named Karl-Borromäus-Kirche (Charles Borromeo Church), but is also known as Karl-Lueger-Gedächtniskirche (Karl Lueger Memorial Church) because of the crypt of the former mayor of Vienna below the high altar. This church in Art Nouveau style was built in 1908–1910 by Max Hegele. The crypt of the Austrian Federal Presidents is located near the Dr. Karl-Lueger Memorial Church. Beneath the sarcophagus, is a burial vault with stairs leading down to a circular room whose walls are lined with niches where the deceased in an urn or coffin can be interred.

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Details

Founded: 1874
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kal Guo (6 months ago)
I really loved this place, although I went there around 2005 Aug, it was really nice there
Sarva Yoga Tarot (7 months ago)
Beautiful place for a photography walk: you will see deer, squirrels, woodpeckers and maybe hamsters. It’s claimed to be the biggest cementery in Europe, also it has the honor-grave of musician „Falco“ as a big attraction.
Joanna Pahlow (8 months ago)
Lots of famous people buried here.
Marko Agic (9 months ago)
the most peaceful places in Vienna.
Aras Sepasian (11 months ago)
I visit here everyday. ♥️
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