The Votive Church (Votivkirche) is a neo-Gothic church located on the Ringstraße in Vienna. Following the attempted assassination of Emperor Franz Joseph in 1853, the Emperor's brother Archduke Ferdinand Maximilian inaugurated a campaign to create a church to thank God for saving the Emperor's life. Funds for construction were solicited from throughout the Empire. The church was dedicated in 1879.

The Votivkirche is made out of white sandstone, similar to the Stephansdom, and therefore has to be constantly renovated and protected from air-pollution and acid rain, which tends to colour and erode the soft stone. The church has undergone extensive renovations after being badly damaged during World War II.

This imposing church constitutes a harmonious whole through the proportions, arrangement, spaciousness and unity of style of all the elements. The impressive main altar catches the eye with its gilded retable and an elaborate ciborium over it.

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Founded: 1879
Category: Religious sites in Austria

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Djalma Alvernaz (10 months ago)
A very beautiful church. Worth it a visit! Go, ExpLLoring and Enjoy It!
Diego Costa Fernandes (10 months ago)
I love to visit this place sometimes. A calm place in a calm city
Flavy T (11 months ago)
An architectural masterpiece, it really worth the visit. It is quite big and it has wonderful strained-glass windows. It can be visited free of charge.
Christos Papadopoulos (11 months ago)
Was under construction (on the outside) on January and we couldn't see all its glory. Also you should note it is closed on Mondays.
Flaviu Rizeanu (2 years ago)
Beautiful church in the heart of Vienna, outstanding architecture! A piece of art! It looks great at night in colorful light.
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