Technisches Museum

Vienna, Austria

The Technisches Museum Wien dates from the early 20th century. The decision to establish a technical museum was made in 1908, construction of the building started in 1909 and the museum was opened in 1918.

The unique exhibits, from the past to the future, make the museum a showplace for exciting technological developments. Multimedia presentations illuminate the influence of technological achievements on our society, economy and culture. Visitors experience the extraordinary world of technology.

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Details

Founded: 1918
Category: Museums in Austria

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anthemis M (10 months ago)
We had a lot of fun in here running around to all the experiments! The location is really big and it takes some time to cover all the areas, but it is worth it. We were impressed with the old cars - they are huge!
Sophia Meier (10 months ago)
There's something for everyone here! Really interesting and well designed. Great for kids too. The only problem is that there is so much to see, that you can't possibly see it all in one afternoon!
Evi Napetschnig (10 months ago)
A great place to spend a rainy day at Vienna.. Special fun for kids - but also for grown up kids.. A lot of nice exhibition pieces showing how everyday things changed over the years, real life vehicles, physik experiments to do on your own..
Kit Kelly (11 months ago)
Take a walk through the Industrial Revolution in a museum meant to esucate the people of Austria about technology's ability to propel man forward from his humble beginnings. Beautiful and gigantic industrial machines, locomotives, and airplanes are throughout. Interesting for adults and kids alike.
Dulan (12 months ago)
A really good technical museum for kids and anyone interested in physics or simply interesting facts about how the world works. The ground floor has a bunch of really fun interactive exercises and explanations and then the levels above contains different exhibitions which will be of varying interest to different people. Will take at least 1.5 hours if you are interested, but I got a bit bored after that from the amount of reading. Favourites were there interactive activities and the smart home section on the upper levels.
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