Technisches Museum

Vienna, Austria

The Technisches Museum Wien dates from the early 20th century. The decision to establish a technical museum was made in 1908, construction of the building started in 1909 and the museum was opened in 1918.

The unique exhibits, from the past to the future, make the museum a showplace for exciting technological developments. Multimedia presentations illuminate the influence of technological achievements on our society, economy and culture. Visitors experience the extraordinary world of technology.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1918
Category: Museums in Austria

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anthemis M (12 months ago)
We had a lot of fun in here running around to all the experiments! The location is really big and it takes some time to cover all the areas, but it is worth it. We were impressed with the old cars - they are huge!
Sophia Meier (12 months ago)
There's something for everyone here! Really interesting and well designed. Great for kids too. The only problem is that there is so much to see, that you can't possibly see it all in one afternoon!
Evi Napetschnig (12 months ago)
A great place to spend a rainy day at Vienna.. Special fun for kids - but also for grown up kids.. A lot of nice exhibition pieces showing how everyday things changed over the years, real life vehicles, physik experiments to do on your own..
Kit Kelly (13 months ago)
Take a walk through the Industrial Revolution in a museum meant to esucate the people of Austria about technology's ability to propel man forward from his humble beginnings. Beautiful and gigantic industrial machines, locomotives, and airplanes are throughout. Interesting for adults and kids alike.
Dulan (14 months ago)
A really good technical museum for kids and anyone interested in physics or simply interesting facts about how the world works. The ground floor has a bunch of really fun interactive exercises and explanations and then the levels above contains different exhibitions which will be of varying interest to different people. Will take at least 1.5 hours if you are interested, but I got a bit bored after that from the amount of reading. Favourites were there interactive activities and the smart home section on the upper levels.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kromeriz Castle and Gardens

Kroměříž stands on the site of an earlier ford across the River Morava. The gardens and castle of Kroměříž are an exceptionally complete and well-preserved example of a European Baroque princely residence and its gardens and described as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The first residence on the site was founded by bishop Stanislas Thurzo in 1497. The building was in a Late Gothic style, with a modicum of Renaissance detail. During the Thirty Years' War, the castle was sacked by the Swedish army (1643).

It was not until 1664 that a bishop from the powerful Liechtenstein family charged architect Filiberto Lucchese with renovating the palace in a Baroque style. The chief monument of Lucchese's work in Kroměříž is the Pleasure Garden in front of the castle. Upon Lucchese's death in 1666, Giovanni Pietro Tencalla completed his work on the formal garden and had the palace rebuilt in a style reminiscent of the Turinese school to which he belonged.

After the castle was gutted by a major fire in March 1752, Bishop Hamilton commissioned two leading imperial artists, Franz Anton Maulbertsch and Josef Stern, arrived at the residence in order to decorate the halls of the palace with their works. In addition to their paintings, the palace still houses an art collection, generally considered the second finest in the country, which includes Titian's last mythological painting, The Flaying of Marsyas. The largest part of the collection was acquired by Bishop Karel in Cologne in 1673. The palace also contains an outstanding musical archive and a library of 33,000 volumes.

UNESCO lists the palace and garden among the World Heritage Sites. As the nomination dossier explains, 'the castle is a good but not outstanding example of a type of aristocratic or princely residence that has survived widely in Europe. The Pleasure Garden, by contrast, is a very rare and largely intact example of a Baroque garden'. Apart from the formal parterres there is also a less formal nineteenth-century English garden, which sustained damage during floods in 1997.

Interiors of the palace were extensively used by Miloš Forman as a stand-in for Vienna's Hofburg Imperial Palace during filming of Amadeus (1984), based on the life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who actually never visited Kroměříž. The main audience chamber was also used in the film Immortal Beloved (1994), in the piano concerto scene.