Mariatrost Basilica

Graz, Austria

The Baroque Mariatrost Basilica is one of the most famous pilgrimage sites of Styria in Austria. The pilgrimage church stands prominently on top of the Purberg hill in the northeast of Graz. It can be reached using the 200 or more steps of the Angelus stair. The basilica is classified as a Baroque building. Two front towers and a dome, visible from a great distance, are the characteristic attributes of the church, which is enclosed by two projecting wings of a former monastery once occupied by the Pauline Fathers (1708–86) and later by the Franciscans (1842–1996).

The building was begun in 1714 by Andreas Stengg and his son Johann Georg Stengg and finished in 1724. The pulpit by Veit Königer (1730/1731) is the masterpiece of the furnishings. The frescoes on the ceiling by Lukas von Schram and Johann Baptist Scheidt are of particular importance.

The main altar includes a statue of the Madonna originally created in the Gothic period around 1465, but altered to the Baroque style in 1695 by Bernhard Echter.

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Address

Kirchplatz 8, Graz, Austria
See all sites in Graz

Details

Founded: 1714-1724
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Neno Lekic (2 years ago)
Good place to visit,nice view.
Steven Jooste (2 years ago)
Beautiful Basilica and certainly a must for its lovely architecture and interior.
Daipeng Zhang (2 years ago)
It is located in a quiet corner. I have been there twice, quite lovely place. You can take bus to reach there.
David Pichler (2 years ago)
Beautiful destination if you want to escape the city
Martina Bujnakova (2 years ago)
An impressive church to see if you are in the area :)
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