Schallaburg Castle

Schallaburg, Austria

The central part of the Schallaburg Castle was built in the German Renaissance Age, beginning around 1540, by the Losenstein dynasty. The castle is combination of a Romanesque residential castle and a Gothic chapel, patterned in the Italian Renaissance style. Aesthetically built, it has a well-decorated two-storied arcaded court with elegant cantilevered staircases and a courtyard. The decorations are in terracotta mosaic depicting mythological figures, gods, masks and human beings and animals; a legendary mythical figurine here is known as Hundefräulein (a female human figure with a dog’s head).

At the gate entrance to the castle, there are two large 'smoke-spewing dragons', each 30 metres long and 6 metres high, which is a favourite entertainment spot for the children to slide down its mouth from the top. Its culturally rich Mannerist gardens have roses, ornamental trees and bushes and herbs planted in the gardens in the town, and two Renaissance apple orchards.

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Founded: 1540
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paulo Karvaly Viégas Fernandes (10 months ago)
Amazing place! Very friendly to families. If you are with kids, ask for a kit at the entrance. The restaurant inside is also worth a lunch or a quick meal. Friendly staff, tasty food and reasonable price.
Nizar Eskic (12 months ago)
Really nice medieval castle, wonderfull exhibit and friendly staff. A good place for a family trip.
Natalia Khilkevitch (2 years ago)
The garden is not very big, but very pretty and everything is arranged with much taste. Some ancients roses, and a couple of interesting plants. The rest is also very nice, very interesting castle. Do not miss it.
Michail SOUSLOV (2 years ago)
Very nice park.
Natalia Khilkevitch (2 years ago)
The garden is not very big, but very pretty and everything is arranged with much taste. Some ancients roses, and a couple of interesting plants. The rest is also very nice, very interesting castle. Do not miss it.
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King Eric's grand daughter, Ingeborg Håkansdotter, inherited the area from her father, King Haakon V of Norway. She and her husband, Eric, Duke of Södermanland, established a semi-independent state out of their Norwegian, Swedish and Danish counties until the death of Erik. They spent considerable time at the fortress. Their son, King Magnus IV of Sweden (Magnus VII of Norway), spent much time at the fortress as well.

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