Oberkapfenberg Castle

Kapfenberg, Austria

Oberkapfenberg is mentioned in a document for the first time in 1173. The current castle was erected around 1264. It was the residence and administrative seat of the Counts of Stubenberg and the seat of the regional High Court for most of the Mürz Valley. Around 1550 it was converted into a Renaissance fortress that was abandoned in 1739 and fell into disrepair. After 1955 the Stubenberg Family rebuilt their ancestral fortress within the old walls and adapted it into a castle hotel. Today Burg Oberkapfenberg is a cultural and culinary attraction of more than regional importance.

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Details

Founded: c. 1264
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dalibor Dado Grabovac (15 months ago)
Excellenté
Cornel Alm (22 months ago)
☺ wonderful view
Ganna Stovpchenko (2 years ago)
The castle is old and not very well-coditioned, but nature around and view on Kapfenberg are nice. There are restaurant and souvenir shop inside as well as several halls for various events.
Sebastian Herbert (3 years ago)
Beautiful place, allowing a great view of town, with a good restaurant. The castle tour is intersting though short. Come on lunchtime and walk around for two hours.
Sebastian Herbert (3 years ago)
Beautiful place, allowing a great view of town, with a good restaurant. The castle tour is intersting though short. Come on lunchtime and walk around for two hours.
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