Oberkapfenberg Castle

Kapfenberg, Austria

Oberkapfenberg is mentioned in a document for the first time in 1173. The current castle was erected around 1264. It was the residence and administrative seat of the Counts of Stubenberg and the seat of the regional High Court for most of the Mürz Valley. Around 1550 it was converted into a Renaissance fortress that was abandoned in 1739 and fell into disrepair. After 1955 the Stubenberg Family rebuilt their ancestral fortress within the old walls and adapted it into a castle hotel. Today Burg Oberkapfenberg is a cultural and culinary attraction of more than regional importance.

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Details

Founded: c. 1264
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sebastian Herbert (2 years ago)
Beautiful place, allowing a great view of town, with a good restaurant. The castle tour is intersting though short. Come on lunchtime and walk around for two hours.
Alex V. (2 years ago)
Great place to visit especially during summer knight festival
Tin Brajković (2 years ago)
Nice view from the castle on the valley
chetna bhutani (2 years ago)
Beautiful views from the top. Simple decor but good tasting food. Can host various events - weddings, exhibitions, musical nights etc. Breeds birds and makes for a great view. All in all, a family place, has something for everyone!
Adam Wright (4 years ago)
Absolutely worth the visit, quite informative and enlightening as to the history and background of the region. The little interactive museum is fun and entertaining for the kids. The restaurant is well run and professional with a comfortable feel also a great selection of food and wine.
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