Schönbühel castle origins date from the early 12th century. The castle is built on rock approximately 40 metres above the level of the river Danube. A Roman fortress may have stood there before. The castle was begun in the early 12th century by Marchwardus de Schoenbuchele as a defensive fortress. When his descendant Ulrich von Schonpihel died at the beginning of the 14th century, the family was extinguished. The castle was briefly owned by Conrad von Eisenbeutel, and then by the Abbey of Melk. In 1396 it was sold to the brothers Caspar and Gundaker von Starhemberg. It remained in the Starhemberg family for more than 400 years, but fell into disrepair.

In 1819 Ludwig Josef Gregor von Starhemberk sold it, together with the castle of Aggstein, to Count Franz von Beroldingen, who had it renovated and partially rebuilt, so that by 1821 it was again habitable.

In 1930 the Schönbühel estate was sold to Count Oswald von Seilern und Aspang.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hannes Höhmüller (2 months ago)
Ein echtes highlight in Der wachau
Peter Hruska (3 months ago)
Privat - nicht zu besichtigen... Imposanter Bau als Tor zur Wachau
Ian Morton (3 months ago)
An impressive castle on the banks of the Danube, with origins in the 12th century. It is private, with no public access, and the best vantage points for photography are either on the river or on the far bank of the river.
Jan Sip (7 months ago)
Beautiful castle, but private, so the o my thing you can do is to take a picture from the other side of the river
Attila Tényi (10 months ago)
Private castle. You can't visit it. Dominant position on the rocks over Danube river. Excellent view good photo theme.
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