Hohenburg Castle Ruins

Lembach, France

Hohenburg castle is assumed to be constructed in the second half of the 13th century. The influence of the Hohenburg family was extensive in the area between Bitche, Saargmünd and Pirmasens. There were feudal relations with the King but also to the Count of Zweibrücken and to the Counts Palatine. The castle is situated close to the German-French border on the Alsace side.

The first known representative of a Hohenburg family was Gottfried Puller who served in the military under the Emperor Friedrich II in 1236. In 1262 the name Hohenburg is documented for the first time, when Konrad and Heinrich of Hohenburg transferred their property to the bishop Heinrich II of Speyer.

The castle was seriously damaged in 1386 by the troops of Strasbourg during the siege and conquest of the neighbouring Löwenstein Castle. During the 30 Year War the castle was seriously damaged and in the 1780’s it was completely destroyed by French troops.

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Address

Lembach, France
See all sites in Lembach

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

cms.burg-lemberg.de

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

pierre getrey (6 months ago)
De cette ruine nous avons une belle vue à 360°. Intégré dans un circuit plaisant.
Claudia Schäfer (6 months ago)
Das Brett zwischen den beiden Felsen ist meiner Meinung nach etwas morsch....
Sandrine Luck (8 months ago)
Belle ballade depuis le Gimbelhof . La ruine est accessible sans grande difficulté et nous offre de splendides points de vue .
Baltazar Gąbka (12 months ago)
Some rocks to climb whit view Nice area to make all day walk
Thomas Panagopoulos (14 months ago)
Ruins of an old castle.The view from that place is amazing.
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