Gurk Cathedral

Gurk, Austria

Gurk Cathedral is a Romanesque pillar basilica and former cathedral built from 1140 to 1200. It is one of the most important Romanesque buildings in Austria.

With its consecration in 1174, the grave of Saint Hemma of Gurk was relocated there from former Gurk Abbey, a Benedictine nunnery she had founded in 1043 and which was dissolved by Archbishop Gebhard of Salzburg in 1070/72, in order to fund the newly established Gurk diocese and the construction of the cathedral. The cathedral chapter established in 1123 moved to Klagenfurt in 1787.

However, despite various late-medieval and Baroque modifications and additions it has preserved its Romanesque character. The elongated building has a westwork with two towers, a gallery, a crypt, and three apses. The crypt, with its 100 columns, is the oldest part of the cathedral. In the middle of the rural Gurktal, the imposing 60 m tall twin steeple of the cathedral can be seen from a very great distance.

Among the rich stock of medieval frescos and Baroque altars, the most notable are the frescos of the bishop's gallery in the west wing of the church which are master works of the serration style in European fresco paintings of the 13th century.

The former convent buildings are to the north of the church; the medieval parts were refashioned in the 17th century and are arranged around the early Baroque arcaded court. The entire convent complex is surrounded by a wall built in the late 15th century following Turkish incursions on the region.

Gurk Cathedral was added to the UNESCO World Heritage Tentative list in 1994.

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Address

Domplatz, Gurk, Austria
See all sites in Gurk

Details

Founded: 1140-1200
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Urša Suhadolc (2 years ago)
Very impressive, but the main altar is a bit scary.
Paul Mmadu (3 years ago)
Nice Place
johann neuhold (3 years ago)
Bahnhof Treibach
Ainars Dominiks (3 years ago)
Beautiful place to have a good time.
Ben Spires (4 years ago)
Simply amazing.....stunning architecture and interior. You must see the vaulted crypt. Also, would recommend the castle at Strassburg down the road. It's historically related and ties in nicely with the timeline.
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