St. Lambrecht's Abbey

Sankt Lambrecht, Austria

St. Lambrecht's Abbey was founded in 1076 by Count Markward of Eppenstein; it was dissolved from 1786 to 1805. In 1938, the building was seized by the National Socialists. From 1942 to 1945, it was used as an external storage facility of the Mauthausen-Gusen concentration camp. The monks returned in 1946.

Locally the two churches within the monastic grounds are called the Grosskirche ('big church') and the Kleinkirche ('little church'). During restoration work of the Grosskirche in the early 1970s extraordinary frescoes dating from the latter half of the 15th century were discovered on the north wall. These show the throne of Solomon.

On the lowest level is depicted the Old Testament Judgment of Solomon, above this the Virgin Mary with the baby Jesus, and above all else Jesus Christ: 'the Word of God made Flesh'. Other frescoes dating from the 14th century depict Saint Christopher and Saint Agnes. Formerly in the monastery there was also a votive altarpiece from which the Master of the Saint Lambrecht Votive Altarpiece received his name; this is now in the Alte Galerie in Graz.

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Details

Founded: 1076
Category: Religious sites in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elisabeth Pranckh (10 months ago)
Fragt nicht....... KOMMT DOCH SELBST HIN !!!!! Es lohnt sich!!!!
Łukasz Keffer (10 months ago)
Spectacular place to visit, great conference center as well.
Marlene Müllner (12 months ago)
Wir waren schon oft dort, aber es ist so schön und interessant wir kommen immer wieder! Man sollte unbedingt eine Führung machen dann versteht man vieles besser!
Andreas Schneider (12 months ago)
Sehr schön, Leider nur in der Touristeninformation IVV-Startkarten für den PW gekauft
Martin Kylar (2 years ago)
OK
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