Petersberg Castle

Friesach, Austria

Around 1076 Archbishop Gebhard of Salzburg, a follower of Pope Gregory VII in the Investiture Controversy, had the Petersberg fortress erected above the town in order to prevent Emperor Henry IV from crossing the Alps. The archbishop also had fierce enemies in the Carinthian ducal House of Sponheim, who after his deposition made several attempts to take possession of Friesach. Constant attacks by Duke Engelbert were finally repelled in 1124. In 1149 King Conrad III of Germany stayed at the castle on his way back from the Second Crusade, as did Richard the Lionheart returning from the Third Crusade in 1192, attempting to elude the guards of Duke Leopold V of Austria.

Today the castle is home to the Friesach City Museum, which features exhibits about the town's history, culture, mining industry and trade.

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Details

Founded: c. 1076
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Livia Papst (3 years ago)
Very nice ambience
Walter Sailer (3 years ago)
A great castle complex. I'm looking forward to the next time when everything is open again ...
Gergely Janya (4 years ago)
Wonderful view of the city, nice place. The museum is a bit expensive ....
Ales Hotko (4 years ago)
Amazing historical castle above the medieval market town with a lot of other historical places to visit. Beautiful exhibition in a tower worth of a visit.
Eli Ari Ilan Zamar (6 years ago)
Wonderful
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