Petersberg Castle

Friesach, Austria

Around 1076 Archbishop Gebhard of Salzburg, a follower of Pope Gregory VII in the Investiture Controversy, had the Petersberg fortress erected above the town in order to prevent Emperor Henry IV from crossing the Alps. The archbishop also had fierce enemies in the Carinthian ducal House of Sponheim, who after his deposition made several attempts to take possession of Friesach. Constant attacks by Duke Engelbert were finally repelled in 1124. In 1149 King Conrad III of Germany stayed at the castle on his way back from the Second Crusade, as did Richard the Lionheart returning from the Third Crusade in 1192, attempting to elude the guards of Duke Leopold V of Austria.

Today the castle is home to the Friesach City Museum, which features exhibits about the town's history, culture, mining industry and trade.

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Details

Founded: c. 1076
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eli Ari Ilan Zamar (15 months ago)
Wonderful
iris wild (16 months ago)
Dienstags kann man die Ruhe rund um die Burg und die Aussicht genießen.
Astrid Lorenz (17 months ago)
Sehr weitläufig schön restauriert tolles Ausflugsziel! Museum empfehlenswert
Bartosz Zawadzki (18 months ago)
nad miastem góruje cudowny zameczek, polecam
Stefan Hosemann (19 months ago)
Petersberg is in the center of Friesach and home of one of the many castles and ruins in this town. It's a nice walk up there - not too hard and definately manageable for kids. Up there, you get a nice view and can see to all the other casltes and ruins. I wouldn't recommend going to Friesach just to see Petersberg, but since there is a lot to do and see, you should go there and check it out as well.
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