Kreuzenstein Castle

Leobendorf, Austria

Kreuzenstein castle was constructed on the remains of an early medieval castle that had fallen into disrepair and was then demolished during the Thirty Years' War. Intended to be a family vault for the Wilczek family, it was rebuilt in the 19th century by Count Nepomuk Wilczek with money from the family's large Silesian coal mines. Kreuzenstein is interesting in that it was constructed out of sections of medieval structures purchased by the family from all over Europe to form an authentic-looking castle.

The origins of Kreuzenstein, like most castles in Lower Austria, date back to the 12th century. Originally built by the Counts of Formbach (now Vornbach, Bavaria), the castle passed into the possession of the Counts of Wasserburg through marriage. Through Ottokar II of Bohemia, the castle came into the possession of the Habsburgs, in 1278.

In July 1527, the Anabaptist preacher Balthasar Hubmaier was arrested under the pretext of causing riots in Mikulov, Moravia and transferred to Burg Kreuzenstein. He was interrogated there but refused to renounce his beliefs and was burned at the stake in Vienna. Until the Thirty Years War, the castle had never been conquered but then it fell into the hands of the Swedish Field Marshall Lennart Torstensson, who, on his departure in 1645, blew up three parts of the building.

Today the castle is a much-loved tourist destination and museum in the surrounding countryside of Vienna. At one time, a classical concert known as the Burgserenade was held in the great hall of the castle, at the end of June each year. This has been discontinued. Through the year from April to October, a falconry show, known as Adlerwarte Kreuzenstein is held on the estate. The recently renovated Burgtaverne Kreuzenstein is a restaurant, furnished to provide the atmosphere of a medieval tavern.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ro. Ka. (2 years ago)
Nice place for a walk and see history
Kyle Handlen (3 years ago)
Hours need to be updated. During the winter months the castle itself is closed (November through March). The tavern is open however and I recommend reservations before you arrive. Very cool castle to walk around and interesting history.
Dragica Daneva (3 years ago)
Wow , what a gorgeous castle and piece of history. Good to go with the kids also.
Pixie Levesque (3 years ago)
A very good look at and explanation by a sweet, young lady, in English, ask about the castle and it's history. Worth going on the guided tour. Fascinating.
Olga Korochkina (3 years ago)
The more interesting castle that I've even seen! Very impressive connection from middle age! Entrance must with the guide, for non - German speakers on the Kass you will get information list on your native language.. For adults - 10 euro. Worth this money!! No doubts
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