Place Stanislas

Nancy, France

Nancy, the temporary residence of a king without a kingdom – Stanislaw I Leszczynski, later to become Duke of Lorraine – is paradoxically the oldest and most typical example of a modern capital where an enlightened monarch proved to be sensitive to the needs of the public. Built between 1752 and 1756 by a brilliant team led by the architect Héré, this was a carefully conceived project that succeeded in creating a capital that not only enhanced the sovereign's prestige but was also functional. Since 1983, the architectural ensemble comprising the Place Stanislas, the extension of its axis, the Place de la Carrière, and the Place d'Alliance, has been on the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

After the War of the Polish Succession in 1737, the Duchy of Upper Lorraine, of which Nancy was the capital, was given to Stanislaw I Leszczynski, former Ruler of Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and father-in-law to King Louis XV of France. An earlier ruler, Leopold, Duke of Lorraine, had undertaken a lot of reconstruction in Lorraine, which had been ravaged by a series of wars. He had surrounded himself by artists and architects, including Germain Boffrand, who trained Emmanuel Héré. Hence, Stanislaw found a pool of talent and experience to draw from on his arrival. The square was a major project in urban planning, dreamt up by Stanislaw I, as a way to link the medieval old town of Nancy and the new town built under Charles III in the 17th century.

In 1831, a bronze statue of Stanislas was placed in the middle of the square.

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Place Stanislas 9, Nancy, France
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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tilo Ebinghaus (9 months ago)
When we went there, they converted the square into a botanical island. Great place to walk around and discover.
Tilo Ebinghaus (9 months ago)
When we went there, they converted the square into a botanical island. Great place to walk around and discover.
Danni Grecu (9 months ago)
Great lunch at grand Cafe Foy, lots open space and wonderful place to visit
Danni Grecu (9 months ago)
Great lunch at grand Cafe Foy, lots open space and wonderful place to visit
Ezinma Egwudo (9 months ago)
Love how the place turns bubbly at night, busy restaurants with. And oh we also loved the park, so serene.
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