Museum of Fine Arts

Nancy, France

The Museum of Fine Arts of Nancy is one of the oldest museums in France. Established in 1793, the museum is housed in one of the four large pavilions on the Place Stanislas.

In 1930, the town council decided to convert the building into a museum in order to host the fine art collection hitherto held in the city hall. In 1999, the art historian Jacques Thuillier donated a huge collection of drawings (2,000) and engravings (13,000) to the museum.

Some of the painters whose work is featured in the collections are Perugino, Tintoretto, Jan Brueghel the Younger, Caravaggio, Georges de La Tour, Charles Le Brun, Ribera, Rubens, Claude Gellée, Luca Giordano, François Boucher, Eugène Delacroix, Édouard Manet, Claude Monet, Paul Signac, Modigliani and Picasso.

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Address

Rue Stanislas 4, Nancy, France
See all sites in Nancy

Details

Founded: 1793
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pierre Koung (3 months ago)
One sentence : it is a beautiful place.
Maxim Hachem (12 months ago)
Amazing pieces from different years.
Wilco Wetzels (14 months ago)
Lot of great art pieces, whose all got the attention they need. Downside, much arts from the 17th century instead of from different time periods. The historical touch in the basement is a good addition. I would recommend this place.
Kyle Toussaint (15 months ago)
Beautiful museum, they were still taking visitors in virus times but imposing strict mask rules and hand sanitizer. Respect. Amazing collection.
Antoine M (21 months ago)
What a place to have one stunning museum of fine arts than to be in one of the pavilions of the Stanislas square! It's one of the oldest museums in France and one spectacular place to visit. It costs €3.50 to enter. Wheelchair friendly, there's lifts as well as beautiful spiral staircases, public convenience, no restaurant inside (as far as I can tell). There's three major exhibition levels here and I suggest starting from the top and work your way down all the way to the last exhibition in the basement level underneath the main entrance pavilion. Paintings range from the early sixteenth century to modern art and sculptures. It's a comprehensive collection and I spent a good hour and a half going through most of the collection. Of interest perhaps is the Jean Prouvé works and the Daum collection of crystal wear at the lower ground level. Besides the spectacular building and the square its located in, this museum of fine arts is a must visit if you are visiting the gorgeous city of Nancy in the Lorraine district of France. Suitable for all ages and tastes in arts.
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